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If you’ve been frequenting JOVM over the past few months, you have come across a post or two about The Acid. Interestingly, the outfit actually is something of an EDM/electronica All-Star group as they consist of Grammy nominated DJ and Producer Adam Freeland, best known for the crossover hit “We Want Your Soul” and head of Brighton (UK)’s Marine Parade Records; Steve Nalepa, a California-based producer, and professor of music technology; and Ry X, a Los Angeles-based Australian artist and producer, who is one half of the electro-pop act Howling, and whose solo debut effort, Berlin was released to critical praise. 

The Acid can initially trace its origins to when Ry X and Adam Freeland, who initially met in Australia several years earlier, ran into each other at a mutual friend’s party. The duo bounded over Ry X’s then-recent stint as part of Berlin’s underground music scene, and they started hanging out and experimenting with song ideas as they often recorded sketches and pieces of songs on their iPhones. And as realized that they were coming up with something interesting, they enlisted the help of Nalpea to further flesh out their material. 

Reportedly, the trio’s debut full-length effort, Liminal nods to the work of Portishead, Aphex Twin, Thom Yorke and Onoehtrix Point Never, and the album’s first single “Fear” was comprised of trembling, undulating synths, layers of shimmering guitars and subtly rumbling bass paired with earnestly sung lyrics in a haunting falsetto. Liminal’s latest single “Ghost” is consists of shimmering, undulating synths, hot flashes of cymbal and eerily cooed vocals in a hazy, spectral mix. Like a wisp of smoke, the song lingers before dissipating into ether. 

The official video, which was shot in the California desert outside of Baker, heavily draws from the work of Salvador Dali and is also partially inspired by a story the video’s co-director Petecia Le Fawnhawk heard heard about the legendary Ray Charles being a big a huge Corvette fan. And as she was looking at a 1967 Stingray, she wondered how a blind person would experience such a beautiful car. The end result is a haunting, surreal and striking. 

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