New Audio: Jurassic 5’s Founder Fullee Love Teams Up with The Internet’s Nick Green on a Shimmering Disco-Influenced Homage to Nile Rodgers

Born Zaakir Muhammad, Fullee Love, (formerly known as Soup) is best known for his work as a founding member of renowned West Coast hip-hop act Jurassic Five, and during their lengthy seven year hiatus, Muhammad struggled to make ends meet, working in retail. Naturally, during that period, Muhammad reflected on his life, where it had gone and what he needed to do. When Jurassic 5 reunited at 2013’s Coachella, Muhammad quickly recognized that it was sink or swim for him — and his solo recording project, Fullee Love was created so that he could continue his path in music.

Interestingly, with the release of his debut EP Still in Fullee Love, Muhammad’s Fullee Love project developed a reputation for a sound that drew from disco, soul, funk and synth funk — all of which he listened to and loved as a child. Muhammad’s Nick Green-produced Fullee Love full-length debut Free, White & 21 is slated for release this Friday, and the album’s latest single “Nile Rodgers (Git on Down)” finds the Jurassic 5 founder paying homage to one of the more prolific and influential characters of pop music — Nile Rodgers. Sonically, the song is centered around a shimmering, disco-like guitar line, a sinuous bass line, stomping percussion and an infectious hook, and it manages to be heavily indebted to Rodgers’ legendary mid/late 70s and early 80s output with Chic, the song also brings Daft Punk’Random Access Memories to mind — “Get Lucky” anyone?

And yes, while the track is a dance-floor and radio friendly track, there’s much more to it; the track finds Nick Green and Fullee Love aiming at the anachronistic, as the song sounds as though it could have been released in 1977, 1982, 2015 or last week but also in the sense that the duo are trying to capture something timeless. People will always seek  the safety, comfort, escape and freedom of strobe lights, thumping bass and sweaty bodies — and when the world seems so dangerously close to crossing the precipice of disaster, those few moments on a dance floor are seemingly heaven sent.

Advertisements