Tag: Beck Odelay

New Video: GUM Returns with a Trippy Animated Visual for “Airwalkin'”

Jay Watson is a Carnavon, Australia-born, Fremantle, Australia-based singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer, who creatively splits his time as a member of acclaimed psych rock acts and JOVM mainstays Tame Impala and POND — and with his acclaimed solo recording project GUM.

Watson’s fifth GUM album Out In The World, which was officially released today through Spinning Top Music, is the highly-anticipated follow-up to 2018’s critically applauded The Underdog. Written and recorded in between  his commitments with POND and Tame Impala at his Fremantle-based home studio and while on the road, Out In The World continues Watson’s long-held reputation for his voracious taste for styles, sounds and eras — paired with his ongoing quest to make sense of modern life.  Driven by untethered curiosity and the inherent anxiety of way too much awareness, the album is arguably, the most boundary pushing of his growing catalog. “This album is my attempt at making a record that combines my fascination of how other people live their lives, with my own internal desire to analyse mine and improve it,” Watson says of his latest album. “‘Out In The World’ was a phrase that conjured a lot of grandeur and ego, yet somehow felt really small and wholesome at the same time.”

Earlier this year, I wrote about “Don’t Let It Go Out,” Out In The World’s second single, a track that found Watson pushing his sound and songwriting in a bold new direction with its influences blurring into something distinctly Watson. “Airwalkin,” the album’s latest single is a swaggering, 80s synth pop inspired banger centered around boom bap-like beats, squiggling and shimmering synths, a soaring string sample, an enormous hook with vocodered vocals and Watson’s plaintive vocals. The  end result is a song that sounds as though it were indebted to J. Dilla. Odelay-era Beck and Future Shock-era Herbie Hancock and Kraftwerk. 

“This song is trying to capture the feeling of walking around my rural town with my Discman as a teenager, completely self-conscious about the way I look but completely feeling myself at the same time.” Watson says. “3 and a half minutes of Boombox Rock inspired by Stevie Wonder, Dilla and Beck.”

Directed  by Alex McClaren, the recently released video for “Airwalkin'” is a vividly colored visual that features a variety of characters —  three-eyed dog, a kid’s toy robot, a walking recycling bin and a walking boom box among others — walking through some trippy yet mischievous backdrops. “I wanted to do something with Alex McClaren again. He’d worked on the claymation video for ‘The Blue Marble’ off my last album, I love his stuff. I only had quite a vague idea that the clip could be a figure moving across a landscape in claymation, a vocoder robot-man initially, and Alex went next level with it’.”

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New Video: Tel Aviv’s Cherie and Renno Release an Old-Timey Visual for Stomping and Strutting New Single “Be My Baby”

Cherie and Renno are an emerging Tel Aviv, Israel-based indie rock act founded by its core duo Ran Shem Tov (vocals, viola) and Shiri Hadar (vocals, keys, bass), with Guy Ben Ami (drums). Interestingly, the rising Israeli act can trace its origins to when its core duo of Shem Tov and Hadar were members of acclaimed act Izabo — but with material centered around a wooden, electronic multi-synth viola that has been built from collected vintage parts. 

“Be My Baby,” the Israeli act’s latest single is a strutting and self-assured track that possesses elements of indie rock, the blues and rockabilly paired with anthemic hooks — and the end result is a mischievously anachronistic sound that’s one part Odelay-era Beck, one part Sun Records, one 60s psych rock and 60s pop. Co-directed by Nissim Farin Shtamper, Lioh Sadeh and Eliran Peled, the recently released video for “Be My Baby” is  fittingly anachronistic visual: shot in an old-timey black and white, the video features stock footage of stock footage of a 60s dance show split with footage of the members of the band performing the song and some low-budget, Twilight Zone-like imagery.  

The members of Cherie and Renno have developed a reputation for their award-winning music production company, The Sound Makers Productions, which specializes in original compositions and scores for film, TV and commercials. They recently wrote the soundtrack for Uri Zohar Returns, a documentary on one of Israel’s biggest cultural figures, including “Summer Smile” based on the film’s theme song.  

New Video: JOVM Mainstays Sego Return with a Trippy Visual for the Post Punk Anthem “Neon Me Out”

Now, over the a significant portion of this site’s nearly nine year history,  I’ve written quite a bit about the Los Angeles, CA-based JOVM mainstays Sego. Initially comprised of Mapleton, UT-born founding duo Spencer Peterson and Thomas Carroll, the band expanded to a quartet with the addition of Alyssa Davey (bass) and Brandon McBride (guitar, keys) last year.

As you may recall, the band’s long-awaited sophomore album Sego Sucks is slated for an April 5, 2019 release through Roll Call Records, and the album is partially inspired by  the band’s extensive touring across North America, Europe and the UK and by the addition of the band’s newest members. Unsurprisingly, both events have made the band’s sound and approach much more focused — while retaining a raucous and rowdy spirit. The rowdy and anthemic album single “Shame” was centered around a shout worthy series of hooks, buzzing and distorted guitars, thumping beats and pulsating electronics paired with ironically delivered lyrics. Sonically speaking, the song found the band moving towards a radio friendly, somewhat pop-leaning take on pop. Interestingly, Sego Sucks’ latest single “Neon Me Out” sort of continues in a similar vein — it’s centered around anthemic, sing along and shout along worthy hooks and a propulsive bass line; however, the song to my ears  is a seamless and mischievous synthesis of Odelay-era Beck and Gang of Four-like post punk. And while radio friendly, the song touches upon social media distortions and social media fame, boredom, phoniness, the desperate attempt to fit into a scene, and so on with a post-modern sense of ironic aplomb. 

Decidedly lo-fi, the recently released video is a lysergic-tinged trip, comprised of a series of collages of the band hanging out, fucking around and so on, the members of the band playing in front of a fun house mirror-like distortion. It creates a weird view of the band’s innermost world.  

 

Earlier this month, I wrote about the  Savannah, GA-based singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, David Brady Lynch. And as you may recall, Lynch began writing and recording his own original music at a very early age; however, over the past few years, Lynch has developed a number of musical projects that showcase a wide array of dynamic and forward-looking sounds, including including the groove-based, electro rock/electro pop act Sunglow, the grittier projects Cray Bags and Greta O. and the Toxic Shock, and the garage rock act The Lipschitz. And with each project Lynch explores different sounds and songwriting approaches while maintaining a thin thread throughout.

Interestingly, Lynch’s latest project found Lynch writing and recording in a spontaneous fashion and according to the Savannah, GA-based singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, moving quickly when he’s long been used to writing within the specific context of different projects with their own personas offered a fresh perspective — and perhaps a bit of a reprieve from strictly structured writing. Lynch’s Bummerville debut, Bottom Feeder is slated for release next week through Graveface Records, and the album’s first single “That Time It Takes” was a gritty, power chord-based rock single that was an amalgamation of 90s grunge and 70s power pop, complete with anthemic hooks. “C U Gone,” Bottom Feeder‘s latest single however, is a wild sonic left turn from its predecessor as it draws directly from scuzzy garage rock and bubblegum pop in a way that oddly enough reminds me of Odelay-era Beck — in particular, “Devil’s Haircut” while retaining a “first-thought-best-thought” improvised vibe.

Lynch will be embarking on a tour to support Bottom Feeder with a backing band featuring his brother Derek (bass), Joshua Sterno (rhythm guitar) and Jonathan Graham (drums) and the tour will feature a February 1, 2018 stop at Max Fish. Check out the tour dates below.
Tour Dates
Fri 1/19 – Chicago, IL @ Cole’s
Sat 1/20 – Indianapolis, IN @ TBA
Sun 1/21 – Lexington, KY @ Liberty House
Mon 1/22 – Nashville, TN @ Found Object
Tues 1/23 – Memphis, TN @ Lamplighter
Wed 1/24 – Birmingham, AL @ TBA
Thu 1/25 – Atlanta, GA @ 529
Fri 1/26 – Savannah, Ga @ The Jinx
Sat 1/27 – Orlando, FL @ Uncle Lou’s
Sun 1/28 – Charleston, SC @ Makeout Reef
Mon 1/29 – Chapel Hill, NC @ The Cave
Tues 1/30 – Charlottesville, VA @ Magnolia House
Wed 1/31 – Baltimore, MD @ True Vine
Thu 2/01 – NYC, NY @ Max Fish w/ Foster Care
Fri 2/02 – Syracuse, NY @ Spithaus
Sat 2/03 – Buffalo, NY @ Deep Space 8
Sun 2/04 – Columbus, OH @ Legion of Doom

Ginger Snaps is a British psych rock/psych pop artist, who has received quite a bit of attention across the UK for a mischievously genre-defying as you’ll hear on the Odelay-era Beck channeling new single “Phat Kids,” which features shimmering guitar chords, tweeter and woofer rocking 808-like beats, swirling electronics, bleeps, bloops and cosmic-sounding effects, and a rousingly anthemic, Brit pop-like hook in a swaggering, breezy and mischievous track.

If you’ve been frequenting this site for the past couple of months, you may recall coming across a post or two about Tucson, AZ-based multi-instrumentalist, electronic music artist and producer Dmitri Manos, whose solo recording project American Monoxide has quietly built a profile for specializing in analog electronic instrumentals that manage to be somewhat abrasive, trashy and funky as hell such as on “Hot Lava Express,” the first single off his sophomore full-length Web Content. Sonically speaking, Manos paired industrial clang and clatter, boom-bap beats, tumbling electronic bloops, beeps and bleeps, scorching synths and Nile Rodgers-inspired funk guitar chords in an offbeat funky song that reminded me quite a bit of Tobacco.

Web Content‘s latest single “Get Into My Way” is a wobbling, shuffling and buzzing song with the sort of twangy alt-country, alt-folk, experimental pop sound reminiscent of Odelay-era Beck — but in this case, as though Beck had recorded the album on old, warped cassette tape, with a breezily narcoleptic feel and an incredibly catchy hook.