Author: William Ruben Helms

I'm a music blogger, critic and photographer, who has had articles and photos published in Downbeat, Premier Guitar Magazine, Brooklyn Magazine, The New York Press, New York Magazine's Vulture Blog, Ins&Outs Magazine, The Noise Beneath the Apple, Glide Magazine, The Whiskey Dregs Magazine and others. Check out The Joy of Violent Movement Shop: https://www.joyofviolentmovement.com/shop Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

Throwback: Happy 77th Birthday, Roger Daltrey

One of the things you should probably know is that I’m a huge fan of The Who. Roger Daltrey has one of the most unique voices in rock. And as it turns out, yesterday was Daltrey’s 77th birthday. Happy birthday, Roger! May there be many, many, many more. Thank you and the band for music that has meant the world to me.

Split between Malibu and Monaco, the emerging electronic music production and artist duo End of Code features the following:

  • Nicolas Saad, a Monaco-based DJ and electronic music producer, whose career can be traced back to the 1990s. Saad has developed a reputation for crafting tracks for French radio and TV. 
  • Shawn Pereira, a Malibu-based model. who taught himself music while traveling the world modeling in campaigns for Ralph Lauren Polo Sport, Diet Coke and Tag Heuer. 

Pereira met Saad while vacationing in St. Barth’s, a small French West Indies territory, that was once a Swedish colony for about 100 years. Bonding over an abiding love of deep house, the duo wound up writing, recording and producing their full-length debut, last year’s The Beginning — and since then, their music has become the official sound of BMW Monaco, playing in every new car sold.

Now, as you may recall, Pereira and Saad began 2020 with the slickly produced yet soulful club banger “Deep Into Your Soul.” Coming hot on the heels of “Deep Into Your Soul,” the duo’s latest single “The Fall” continues the duo’s growing reputation for crafting slickly produced bangers. Featuring wobbling synth arpeggios, skittering beats, crooned male vocals, atmospheric electronics and an enormous hook, “The Fall” manages to simultaneously be brooding yet euphoric in a way that reminds me quite a bit of Octo Octa’s Between Two Selves.

End of Code are working on their highly-anticipated follow-up to The Beginning, which they hope will be released later this year.

New Video: Hungarian Electro Pop Duo Paperdeer Teams Up With Böbe on a Sleek and Futuristic Single and Visual

Paperdeer is an emerging Budapest-based electronic music production and artist duo featuring Benjámin Kiss and Norbert Biró. The duo will be releasing a new album this year, an album that was written and recorded during pandemic-related restrictions and lockdowns. The forthcoming album’s latest single “Fortress,” which features longtime collaborator, Hungarian vocalist Böbe Szécsi is a sleek and slickly produced bit of electro pop featuring layered arpeggiated and twinkling synths, atmospheric electronics, skittering beats, Szécsi’s plaintive vocals and a soaring hook with an expansive song structure. Although the song is bracingly chilly, the song is rooted in the tense uncertainty of our moment, with a pent-up frustration and desperation for necessary change — right now.

“It has been an endeavor in distant music-making,” Paperdeer’s Benjámin Kiss says about their creative process in press notes. “Norbert sent me the initial beats a year ago, and I fell in love with it. So, ever since, we have been going back and forth with the ideas until the song came together. We approached the vocal from two directions and then really completed the tune when we worked out the lyrics.”

“The lyrics of ‘Fortress’ can be interpreted in many ways. In my opinion, it is a cry for help,” Böbe Szécsi says in press notes. “It is enough if you look around: climate change, COVID-19, and political tension are the things that we are faced with and also the burden of uncertainty that it suggests. In the middle of this chaos, I would just want to shout at the top of my lungs to make it stop and to seek meaningful changes otherwise, the consequences will be fatal.” Norbert Biró adds that the song described a feeling of drifting and helplessness which comes around when you are so lost and so little in a massive crowd. You have no other option but to follow because they allow no say in the directions. Böbe, the young woman in the music video, embodies just that.

Directed by Márton István Szabó, who also collaborated on the song’s lyrics, the recently released video features his own technique of reversed digital projection. “We took pictures with a black backdrop, and we made them half-transparent,” Szabó explains. “In this state, we layered them digitally with colors to enhance the character’s body and clothing. My technical approach tied in with the meaning of this song: we mixed drone and studio footages just as we mixed fiction with reality in the story while also portraying the exhaustion that comes from escapism.”

News/Announcements: Shoutouts to Patreon Patrons

Pandemic-related restrictions and lockdowns have made it extraordinarily difficult for an overwhelming majority of independent artists across the world to survive. Entire industries and livelihoods have been wiped out for an indefinite amount of time without any significant solutions or assistance from the federal government during the Trump Administration. Of course, we all hope that the Biden Administration will undo their predecessors evil and fucked up policies and help all of those who desperately need help. But if you’re a realist, there’s an innate understanding that significant portions of the policy suggestions and ideas that the Biden Administration have put down on paper may not pass. We shall see. But in the meantime, the Save Our Stages Act has managed to save countless venues across the country from folding for a little while at least.

I’d guarantee that during the past year, you’ve turned to some sort of art for spiritual, emotional and intellectual sustenance, entertainment or to just fill up time. And as a result, championing artists and their work seems even more important — especially since there are countless other entertainment options competing for everyone’s time, money, attention, love and energy. After all, there are only 24 hours in a day — and I know that people like to actually sleep on occasion.

Because this site has long been a DIY labor of love, I’ve often felt that I have an intimate understanding of the plight of the musicians and artists I’ve covered throughout the past decade-plus of this site’s history. And throughout this site’s history, I’ve been constantly reminded of several key facts:

  • Art costs money — and without money, it can’t exist. 
  • Artists are small businesses. So supporting artists is supporting a small business. 
  • A small bit of support can go a long way. A $20, $30, $40, $50 or $60 purchase of someone’s work can often mean the purchase of groceries or covering the cost of a subscription they need to continue their work or anything along those lines. That same $50 or $60 doesn’t really mean shit to Amazon. 
  • Supporting an artist/small business can keep money within your community. Amazon or some other mega-conglomerate doesn’t give a fuck about your community or your neighbors. 

Of course, I hope that my work has led you to listen to music and appreciate it in a deeper and more thorough way — to “listen in technicolor” as a friend told me; that my work has led you to an eclectic array of artists, whose work will become part of your lives, as it has been mine. Additionally, I hope that my photography has added some beauty to your day, and inspired you to see the world in a new way — or to take a moment to appreciate something cool or beautiful.

To that end, I’m asking you once again for your support. I’m continuing to sell merch through this site’s shop. You can find photographic prints — from my live concert photography to street photography and even some outdoor/nature photos. I also still have a shit ton off JOVM bumper stickers. All of this stuff is beautiful and could use a loving forever home. I periodically update offerings, so you should check back every now and then. You can check out the store here: 

You can support by becoming one of my Patreon patrons. Every dollar means something. There are different patronage levels and different rewards for your support. For more information, you can check out the Patreon page here: 

https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

If you’re not already a fan of this site on Facebook, please feel free to become a fan here: 

https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

I know that a lot of folks are struggling to get by. If you find yourself in that situation, there are a few simple ways you can support and show love that won’t hurt your checkbook: 

  • You may notice that towards the bottom of every post there’s a section with related posts. If you really dig what JOVM is about, keep following and keep reading. From my understanding, the more articles you read and the more time you spend here, really helps in terms of the various algorithms that impact ad revenue and Google Search. 
  • Pass the word on to friends and associates, who may want to support independent journalism and criticism in all forms. 
  • Pass the word on to friends and associates, who may actually dig the artists I’ve spent the past decade covering. And trust me, those hardworking, amazing artists would love it, too. 
  • Retweets, Facebook shares and reblogs are also another wonderful way that you can support and show love. Every pair of eyeballs — both new and old — are cherished here. 

All of these things mean the world to me. And I can’t thank those folks who have supported me and my work through all of these ways enough. Of course, as I do every month, I wanted to thank my Patreon patrons for their support:

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Mike Held 

Throwback: Black History Month: Wu-Tang Clan

Today is February 28, 2021. It’s the last day of February and of Black History Month. Throughout the past month, I’ve featured Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of greens and styles — with the hopes that this series will serve as a sort of primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

While we’re at it, let’s remember the following:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

I’ve often said that hip-hop is the lingua franca of everyone under about 55 or so. And to that end, I’d almost guarantee that everyone from New York to Beijing, from Buenos Aires to Amsterdam from Johannesburg to New Delhi knows and loves the legendary Wu-Tang Cla

Throwback: Black History Month: Gil Scott-Heron

Today is February 28, 2021. It’s the last day of February and of Black History Month. Throughout the past month, I’ve featured Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of greens and styles — with the hopes that this series will serve as a sort of primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

While we’re at it, let’s remember the following:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

Gil Scott-Heron is sort of a spiritual godfather to hip-hop and neo-soul — and I can make a fair argument that Public Enemy, Common, Talib Kweli and Mos Def, a.k.a Yasin Bey are indebted to the legend’s work, which threw together spoken word poetry, jazz, the blues and rock in a difficult to pigeonhole mix. And although he hasn’t been with us in about a decade, his work is still an incisive, unnerving look at race in America and globally.

Throwback: Black History Month: Queen Latifah

Today is February 28, 2021. It’s the last day of February and of Black History Month. Throughout the past month, I’ve featured Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of greens and styles — with the hopes that this series will serve as a sort of primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

While we’re at it, let’s remember the following:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

I have to show more love to the ladies. I immediately thought of the ridiculously talented, charismatic and beautiful Queen Latifah.

Throwback: Black History Month: Big Mama Thornton

Today is February 27, 2021. It’s the 27th day of Black History Month. And as I’ve mentioned throughout this series, I’ve been featuring Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of genres and styles — with the hopes that it’ll be a bit of a primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

Of course, I hope that these posts will serve as a reminder of these very important facts:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

It’s February 27, 2021. The 27th day of Black History Month, which is rapidly coming to a close. Of course, let’s not forget Big Mama Thornton. Without her, Elvis wouldn’t have one of his signature hits. And she just kicked ass and took names in her own brassy way.

Throwback: Black History Month: John Coltrane

Today is February 27, 2021. It’s the 27th day of Black History Month. And as I’ve mentioned throughout this series, I’ve been featuring Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of genres and styles — with the hopes that it’ll be a bit of a primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

Of course, I hope that these posts will serve as a reminder of these very important facts:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

It’s February 27, 2021. The 27th day of Black History Month, which is rapidly coming to a close. I grew up in a music obsessed home — and to my father, John Coltrane was God. And so here’s God playing gorgeous music. That’s right John William Coltrane is God. The end.

Throwback: Black History Month: Miles Davis

Today is February 26, 2021. It’s the 26th day of Black History Month. And as I’ve mentioned throughout this series, I’ve been featuring Black artists across a wide and eclectic array of genres and styles — with the hopes that it’ll be a bit of a primer on the Black experience and on Black music.

Of course, I hope that these posts will serve as a reminder of these very important facts:

Black culture is American culture — and Black music is American music.
America’s greatest and beloved contributions to the world are Black music styles — the blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop.
Black art matters.
Black lives matter — all of them, all of the time.

It’s February 27, 2021. The 27th day of Black History Month, which is rapidly coming to a close. I don’t think you can talk about Black History Month without showcasing Miles Davis, one of the towering figures of jazz and modern music.