Tag: Manatee Commune

New Video: JOVM Mainstay Geographer Releases a Wistful Visual for Soaring and Plaintive “Summer of My Discontentment”

JOVM mainstay Mike Deni is a New Jersey-born, Los Angeles, CA-based singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, electro pop artist and producer, best known for his solo recording project Geographer. As the story goes, Deni relocated to San Francisco while living in the aftermath of the sudden and tragic death of his sister — and then the equally unexpected death of his father. While sleeping on a floor of a friend’s Haight-Ashbury apartment, Deni serendipitously found a synthesizer on the street and began to channel his grief and optimism into the songs that would eventually comprise his full-length debut 2008’s Innocent Ghost. And through the release of two more full-length albums 2012’s Myth, 2015’s Ghost Modern and three EPs, 2010’s Animal Shapes EP, 2015’s Endless Motion EP and last year’s Alone Time EP, Deni has received attention across the blogosphere for his unique, textured and soulful blend of analog, electronic  and acoustic elements, a sound that he has described as “soulful music from outer space.” 

Building upon a growing profile, Deni has toured with the likes of K. Flay, The Flaming Lips, Young The Giant, Tycho, Ratatat, Betty Who and Tokyo Police Club, and he played sets at Outside Lands Festival and Firefly Festival. Interestingly, last year the JOVM mainstay gave up his San Francisco apartment and hopped between tours and friends churches for the next six months, including a month stay back in Jersey and a few weeks in Italy (where both sides of his family are from). And he did that before finally relocating to Los Angeles. During that period of shiftlessness in which he was in limbo between his old life and new life, Deni wound up writing the material, which would eventually comprise his recently released New Jersey EP. 

Many of the songs of the New Jersey EP began in his childhood home and were finished at a friend’s Los Angeles home while he was looking for an apartment; in fact, the EP’s first two singles “Love is Wasted in the Dark” and its latest single “Summer of My Discontentment” were part of the first batches of material written during that period. “Summer of My Discontentment” is a perfect example of the JOVM mainstay’s specialty — swooning and earnest 80s-inspired synth pop, centered around a twinkling and arpeggiated piano, thumping beats, a soaring hook and Deni’s plaintive and aching vocals; but unlike some of his previously released material, the song possesses a wistful air that comes from nostalgia for a long-gone, seemingly simpler time that you can’t have ever again — and the dreams your younger self may have given up for the compromises of adulthood. 

Directed by Patrick Mattes, the recently released accompanying video follows a group of young people, full of youthful hopes and dreams on a gloriously sunny day while Deni broodingly sings the song from a different vantage point, during sunset. In some way, the video implies that the action are the reflections and reminiscing of the video’s central character — from the perspective of a complicated adulthood. 

 

Back in 2016, I wrote a bit about the Seattle, WA-based multi-instrumentalist, electronic music artist and producer Grant Eadie. Eadie has received attention both regionally and nationally for his solo recording project Manatee Commune, which specializes in a carefully molded sound in which he pairs natural overtones extracted from various field recordings and other sources, live instrumentation and arrangements with slick yet nuanced production.

Although a few years have passed since I’ve written about the Pacific Northwest-based JOVM mainstay, he has been rather busy, writing and releasing new material and collaborating with an eclectic array of artists, including his latest track “Growing Pains.” Centered around a breezy and ethereal production featuring a looping and shimmering guitar line, stuttering beats, an infectious hook and a soulful vocal contribution from Samuel Eisen-Meyers, the seemingly self-assured track reveals a familiar uncertainty and awkward awareness that reminds me of when I was in my mid 20s — when you’re made to feel as though you’re maladjusted when you haven’t quite figured out your life or anything else. (Of course, as I got older, I realized that feeling was bullshit — mainly because no one really has it together.)

“Growing Pains is a song about exploring life in your mid 20s,” Eadie says. “We are told we are supposed to have everything figured out by then, but this often is not the case. In the last year I’ve come to realize that I am doing exactly what I should be doing. Feeling the pains of growth is a sign of growth and every battle won is a step forward in the right direction. As long as you are doing what you love, you are on the right path.”

 

 

 

If you’ve been frequenting JOVM over the past couple of months you may be familiar with Pacific Northwest-based multi-instrumentalist, electronic music artist and producer Grant Eadie and his solo recording project Manatee Commune; in fact, you may even recall that Eadie has received both regional and national attention for a carefully and organically molded sound in which he pairs natural overtones extracted from various field recordings and other sources, live instrumentation and arrangements and slick, incredibly nuanced, contemporary production. Eadie’s latest EP Thistle was recorded earlier this year and from the EP’s first two singles “Clay,” and “What We’ve Got,” the EP will further cement Eadie’s reputation for an infectious yet breezy production style. “Clay” paired twinkling and chiming percussion, a looped flute sample, layers of shimmering synths and swirling electronics with Marina Price’s flirtatious and sultry vocals in a bouncy and coquettish song that reminded me of a slightly more dance floor friendly version of Sylvan Esso. “What We’ve Got” had Eadie pairing a distorted vocal sample with choppy cascades of synths, twinkling and fluttering electronics, handclaps, enormous tweeter and woofer rocking beats and an infectiously upbeat swagger.

Thistle‘s latest single “The Garden Song” may arguably be the EP’s most lush song as twinkling and chiming percussion are paired with stuttering beats, handclaps, stuttering synth stabs with Moorea Massa’s sultry R&B vocal stylings in a swooning song that evokes the ebullient joy, awkwardness and pangs of love — and that initial moment when you realize that you’re hopelessly and madly in love and you’re both elated and frightened over what it really means for you. Interestingly, I think this particular single is the most radio-friendly song as it leans heavily towards contemporary pop, complete with a breezy and infectious hook.

 

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With his solo recording project Manatee Commune, multi-instrumentalist, electronic music artist and producer Grant Eadie has received attention both across his native Pacific Northwest and nationally for a carefully and organically molded electronic sound in which he pairs natural overtones extracted from field recordings and other sources and live instrumentation and arrangements with slick and incredibly nuanced, contemporary electronic production. Now, if you’ve been following this site since earlier this year, you may recall that Eadie’s most recent EP Thistle was released earlier this year through renowned Brooklyn-based label Bastard Jazz Recordings, the label home of Illa JLord Echo and several others.

Interestingly, Eadie’s latest effort is the result of the multi-instrumentalist, electronic music artist and producer deciding to radically change his songwriting, recording and production process by opening up his studio and gear to friends, collaborators and loved ones, gaining inspiration from the energy of each of those interactions. As Eadie explains in press notes “Learning how to share my creative process with my friends completely revolutionized the last of year of music for me. Inviting those I trusted and loved into my studio to spend even just an hour talking or jamming opened fountains of inventive energy for me, especially from the ones who lacked any musical knowledge. I soon found myself incredibly inspired by the originality of even the smallest interactions with people, and so I pointed my field mic at anyone who had a story, a melody, or a stumbling beat they had been absentmindedly drumming, all in the hopes of capturing their individuality and framing it with my ever expanding insight into audio production.”

Clay,” Thistle‘s first single paired a stuttering yet breezy and coquettish production twinkling and chiming percussion, a looped flute sample, layers of shimmering synths and swirling electronics with Marina Price’s flirtatious and sultry vocals. Now to my years, the song reminded me a bit of Sylvan Esso — but bouncier and slightly more dance floor friendly. The EP’s latest single “What We’ve Got” is a collaboration featuring the sensual cooing of Flint Eastwood that will further cement Eadie’s growing reputation for slick, coquettish, summertime friendly productions — in this particular song pairs a distorted vocal sample with choppy synths cascades, twinkling and fluttering electronics, handclaps, enormous tweeter and woofer rocking beats. And while being as equally sensual as the previously released single, “What We Got” possess an infectiously upbeat swagger.

You can catch Eadie live this summer as he embarks on a tour that includes a NYC area stop at Alphaville in August. Check out tour dates, below.

Tour Dates
7/7 Victoria, BC – Phillips Backyard
8/10 San Diego – The Hideout*
8/11 Los Angeles – The Echoplex*
8/12 San Francisco – Thee Parkside*
8/14 Seattle – Nectar*
8/16 Madison – Majestic*
8/17 Chicago – Schubas*
8/18 Philadelphia – Milkboy*
8/19 NYC – Alphaville*
8/20 DC – Songbyrd*
* Sync or Swim Tour w/ Shallou

New Video: Check Out The Playfully and Manically Charming, New Video for Manatee Commune’s “Clay”

Electronic music artist, multi-instrumentalist and producer Grant Eadie and his solo recording project Manatee Commune have received regional attention across the Pacific Northwest and a growing national profile for a carefully and organically molded electronic sound that […]

Electronic music artist, multi-instrumentalist and producer Grant Eadie and his solo recording project Manatee Commune has received regional attention across the Pacific Northwest and a growing national profile for a carefully and organically molded electronic sound that pairs natural overtones extracted from field recordings with slick and nuanced electronic production.

Eadie’s soon-to-be released EP, Thistle, slated for a February 26 release marks two new developments in the young producer, multi-instrumentalist and electronic music artist’s career — it’s his first release through renowned Brooklyn-based label Bastard Jazz Recordings, the label home of Illa J, Lord Echo and several others; and the effort is the result of Eadie radically changing his songwriting, production and recording process as he  opened his studio and gear to friends, collaborators and loved ones, gaining inspiration from the energy of each of those interactions. As Eadie explains in press notes “Learning how to share my creative process with my friends completely revolutionized the last of year of music for me. Inviting those I trusted and loved into my studio to spend even just an hour talking or jamming opened fountains of inventive energy for me, especially from the ones who lacked any musical knowledge. I soon found myself incredibly inspired by the originality of even the smallest interactions with people, and so I pointed my field mic at anyone who had a story, a melody, or a stumbling beat they had been absentmindedly drumming, all in the hopes of capturing their individuality and framing it with my ever expanding insight into audio production.”

Thistle’s first single “Clay” pairs a stuttering yet breezy and coquettish production consisting of twinkling and chiming percussion, a looped flute sample, layers of shimmering synths and swirling electronics with Marina Price’s flirtatious and sultry vocals to craft a song that reminds me quite a bit of Sylvan Esso — but bouncier and slightly more dance floor friendly. Considering the Arctic weather we’re soon to have in New York, “Clay” is a brief yet lush and necessary blast of summer.

Catch Eadie live throughout March and April as he tours the Pacific Northwest with Blackbird Blackbird and Chad Valley. Check out tour dates below.

Tour Dates 

3.3 Bellingham, WA Wild Buffalo (EP Release Party)
3.10 Portland OR, Mississippi Studios ^
3.11 Seattle WA, Nectar Lounge ^
4.19 Tucson, AZ Club Congress *
4.20 San Diego, CA The Hideout *
4.21 Los Angeles, CA The Echoplex *
4.22 Santa Cruz, CA The Catalyst *
4.23 San Francisco, CA Social Hall *
4.30 Vancouver, BC Alexander *
^ with YPPAH
* with Blackbird Blackbird & Chad Valley