Category: News/Announcements

Over 12 years ago, I started what has been for me, my life’s work — this site. And honestly, when I started this site, I couldn’t have imagined three-quarters of the things I’ve done and experienced over JOVM’s history to ever happen. 

  • I’ve covered roughly 1,100-1,200 shows in NYC, with a handful of shows in ChicagoBaltimore and Philadelphia
  • I’ve covered about a dozen or more festivals, including traveling to Montreal for M for Montreal back in 2019. 
  • I’ve been a panelist at Mondo.NYC Festival and at New Colossus Festival, speaking about PR, promotion and press for indie artists, giving my perspective as a indie blogger. 
  • A few years ago, I made a cameo in a JOVM mainstay’s music video. It’s a very noticeable spot towards the end of the video. It was a fun experience, but so far no one has called me about acting gigs. Maybe I need to stick to the writing and photography? 
  • I couldn’t have imagined photographing George ClintonPatti LaBelleSnoop DoggBlondieNile RodgersRoky EricksonPhilip BaileyBlind Boys of Alabama and so many others, as well as this site’s countless mainstays.
  • I wouldn’t have met the countless colleagues and musicians, who have become supporters and friends. And by far, music friends have proven to be the very best of friends. 

During the middle of the very worst of the pandemic, things seemed — understandably — bleak. And although we’re slowly managed to claw our way back to an even greater degree of normalcy, in which gathering together can happen, things across the music industry still seem rather bleak: Touring has always been a big financial risk for musicians but COVID-19 has made it even more complicated, because musicians are out there risking their health and lives — because they need to make money to live. 

We’re all trying to figure out how to maneuver in a new, confusing and uncertain landscape that may well be with us for an indefinite period of time. But with these past 12 years under my belt, I have no intentions of going anywhere. 

I strongly believe that I’ve managed to carve out a unique spot in the blogosphere, a place that I feel is desperately necessary because both the music and media worlds are often so incredibly homogenous. Someone out there has to do something different. And representation in every aspect matters. So JOVM and my work with it has to continue.

As I do every month, I want to thank the following folks and organizations. Without them this past few years — and especially this year — wouldn’t have been remotely possible: 

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

All of those folks have been generous Patreon patrons. Of course, feel free to check out the Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement. And if you’re able to support, your support will be greatly appreciated and continuously shouted out. Any amount really helps.

I have to thank the folks at Creatives Rebuild New York. I’m relieved, proud and humbled to be included in their Guaranteed Income for Artists program. The money I’ll receive over the next 18 months will be put to good use — keeping this little dream of mine going. I don’t think there’s enough words to thank them — or to show how grateful I am. (I’ll keep trying, of course!) 

There are other ways you can support. 

You can also support by checking the JOVM shop: https://www.joyofviolentmovement.com/shop 

You can also support my following me on the following platforms:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/william_ruben_helms 

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/yankee32879 and https://www.twitter.com/joyofviolent 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

And you can hire me for headshots, portraits and events. Seriously, I’m available for that, too. You can click here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/ny/new-york/william-h?duration=1?duration=1# or you can contact me directly.

MerchFriends, a is new 501 (c) organization led by Hello Merch co-founder, The Format’s Sam Means, brings together some of the top names in the merch industry to produce content, events, and educational material aimed at influencing and supporting a healthy independent music merch ecosystem. Their mission is to unite independent merch makers to support and sustain both the industry and artists that they serve.

Interestingly, MerchFriends have teamed up with the folks at Spotify, the world’s most used streaming service for the inaugural Band Shirt Day today. Band Shirt Day is a celebration of merch and giving. It’s a global fundraising event that combines the love and nostalgia of the iconic band shirt with an opportunity for artists to raise money for worthy, charitable causes.

The artists participating in Band Shirt Day include Portugal. The Man, Sonic Youth, Best Coast, Matt Nathanson, Black Pumas, Parquet Courts, Indigo De Souza, Bush Tetras, Roar, SPELLING, Equal Vision Records, and Rude Records. The GoFundMe account for Band Shirt Day will collect donations on behalf of the participating artists. The funds’ recipients will include the ACLU, The Ally Coalition, Voices of Children, MusiCares, Planned Parenthood and more.

Similar to Record Store Day or the Australia Music T-Shirt Day, Band Shirt Day invites artists to create and sell unique limited edition merch items while encouraging them to use their platform to create change. Artists can participate by listing their specially designed merchandise on HelloMerch.com, or existing sales channels with proceeds going directly to their selected charity. They can also use their Spotify profile to offer a special tee or merch deal and leverage Spotify’s Fan Support tool to encourage their listeners and fans to donate to Band Shirt Day’s official GoFundMe or to raise money for another cause directly from their artist profile.

“We at Rude Records believe that everyone has the opportunity and responsibility to make the world a better place,” the folks at Rude Records say in a statement. “That is why, through our charity branch Rude Cares, we support several projects to end inequality, social injustice and to make the world more sustainable for future generations. We are honored to take part in Band Shirt Day and thankful for having the chance to be part of this great initiative with our artists!”

“Glad to see Band Shirt Day raising the profile for the good work that bands do. It means a lot to us to get the extra exposure for our Foundation”  Portugal. The Man say of the decision to participate in Band Shirt Day.

For my fellow New Yorkers, Band Shirt Day will be Band Shirt Weekend. MerchFriends is patterning with Rough Trade to curate the Indieplaza’s Artist Merch Market at the inaugural Indieplaza at Rockefeller Center — and to establish a Band Shirt Day presence at the festival that takes place this weekend.

The Artist Merch Market will feature limited-edition merchandise from Hello Merch, Low Level, Favorite Vegetable, plus Rough Trade vinyl bins, live screen printing from Upstate Merch, live art demonstrations from the legendary Steve Keene, Jose Berrio, artist signings and festival merch, DIY family fun, interactive games and more!

A full list of participating Band Shirt Day artists, merch, and causes
can be found here: https://bandshirtday.com/directory

Artists can register to participate in Band Shirt Day here: https://bandshirtday.com

Info on Indieplaza can be found here: https://www.rockefellercenter.com/events/indieplaza-at-rockefeller-center/

Band Shirt Day’s GoFundMe can be found here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/bandshirtday

https://www.merchfriends.org/ 

M for Montreal — M pour Montreal in French — is an annual conference, which takes place over the course of four days in late November in Canada’s second largest city. Since the inaugural conference back in 2005, M for Montreal has quickly expanded to feature a selection of over 100 emerging, buzz-worthy and/or breakout acts from across Quebec, the rest of Canada and internationally playing in showcases in some of Montreal’s top venues.

The annual conference also welcomes over 300 music industry professionals to Montreal for professional programming and networking tailored specifically for folks in the industry. This year, conference delegates will be able to attend a full slate of panels and workshops that address some of the most pressing issues, trends and talking points in the music industry today, including copyright in the Metaverse, the impact of international A&R, and the industry’s relationship with mental health, among others. The conference will also host several keynote sessions led by some of the industry’s major players, including Sub Pop Records‘ CEO Megan Jasper.

This year also marks the return of additional activities and events for delegates to partake in throughout the conference’s four days. Past favorites like the Music PEI Brunch Club, Artist Lab, co-presented by TuneCore and QUB musique and M for Marathon presented by SiriusXM all return this year. Additionally, there will be a variety of professional networking opportunities, including in-person mixers for delegates — or through the virtual M for Mixer platform. Partner delegations from Wales and the Czech Republic will also be in town to present activities for Pro badge holders. Of course, hopefully the delegates will have some free time to eat a couple of smoked meat sandwiches, some poutine and maybe even some bagels while in town. (I attended in 2019 and stopped at La Banquise for some late night poutine — and I’m still dreaming of it. Seriously, it was that good!)

M for Montreal’s organizers announced the first wave of showcasing artists earlier this year. But as they’re gearing up for the conference, they recently announce the full lineup of artists in its 2022 Official Selection series. Now spotlighting 29 of Canada’s most exciting, buzz-worthy acts (up from 20 last year), this year’s Official Selection embraces the conference’s values of equity and inclusivity, featuring artists from a diverse spectrum of identities, backgrounds and genres.

Some of the Official Selection acts include Quebecois experimental indie rock outfit Bibi Club, acclaimed Belgian-Canadian singer/songwriter Cedric Noel, Vancouver heavy shoegazers Kamikaze Nurse, and Ontario Anishinabe indie duo Ombiigizi. (The full lineup is right below.)

The 17th edition of M for Montreal will feature two portions — a virtual conference that will take place from November 9, 2022 – November 10, 2022 and an in-person conference that will take place from November 16, 2022 – November 19, 2022.

Passes for this year are on sale right now and are available in two tiers: All-access Pro badges and Melomaniac badges available to the general public — but quantities are limited. Check out the following link for information and to purchase: https://mpourmontreal.com/en/billetterie/

12 years ago, I started what has been for me — my life’s work.

And honestly, when I started this site, I couldn’t have imagined three-quarters of the things I’ve done and experienced over JOVM’s history to ever happen. 

  • I’ve covered roughly 1,100-1,200 shows in NYC, with a handful of shows in ChicagoBaltimore and Philadelphia.
  • I’ve covered about a dozen or more festivals, including traveling to Montreal for M for Montreal back in 2019. 
  • I’ve been a panelist at Mondo.NYC Festival and at New Colossus Festival, speaking about PR, promotion and press for indie artists, giving my perspective as a indie blogger. 
  • A few years ago, I made a cameo in a JOVM mainstay’s music video. It’s a very noticeable spot towards the end of the video. It was a fun experience, but so far no one has called me about acting gigs. Maybe I need to stick to the writing and photography? 
  • I couldn’t have imagined photographing George ClintonPatti LaBelleSnoop DoggBlondieNile RodgersRoky EricksonPhilip BaileyBlind Boys of Alabama and so many others, as well as this site’s countless mainstays.
  • I wouldn’t have met the countless colleagues and musicians, who have become supporters and friends. And by far, music friends have proven to be the very best of friends. 

JOVM turned 10 in June 2020. And during the middle of the very worst of the pandemic, things seemed — understandably — bleak. And although we’re slowly managed to claw our way back to a degree of normalcy, in which gathering together can happen, things across the music industry still seem rather bleak: Touring has always been a big financial risk for musicians but COVID-19 has made it even more complicated, because musicians are out there risking their health and lives — because they need to make money to live. 

We’re all trying to figure out how to maneuver in a new, confusing and uncertain landscape that may well be with us for an indefinite period of time. But with these past 12 years under my belt, I have no intentions of going anywhere. 

I strongly believe that I’ve managed to carve out a unique spot in the blogosphere, a place that I feel is desperately necessary because both the music and media worlds are often so incredibly homogenous. Someone out there has to do something different. And representation in every aspect matters. So in many ways, this has to continue. 

As I do every month, I want to thank the following folks and organizations. Without them this past few years — and especially this year — wouldn’t have been remotely possible: 

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

All of those folks have been generous Patreon patrons. Of course, feel free to check out the Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement. And if you’re able to support, your support will be greatly appreciated and continuously shouted out. Any amount really helps. Seriously. 

I must thank the folks at Creatives Rebuild New York. I’m relieved, proud and humbled to be included in their Guaranteed Income for Artists program. The money I’ll receive over the next 18 months will be put to good use — keeping this little dream of mine going. I don’t think there’s enough words to thank them — or to show how grateful I am. (I’ll keep trying, of course!) 

There are other ways you can support. 

You can also support by checking the JOVM shop: https://www.joyofviolentmovement.com/shop 

You can also support my following me on the following platforms:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/william_ruben_helms 

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/yankee32879 and https://www.twitter.com/joyofviolent 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

And you can hire me for headshots, portraits and events. Seriously, I’m available for that, too. You can click here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/ny/new-york/william-h?duration=1?duration=1# or you can contact me directly.

12 years ago, I started what has been for me — my life’s work.

And honestly, when I started this site, I couldn’t have imagined three-quarters of the things I’ve done and experienced over JOVM’s history to ever happen. 

  • I’ve covered roughly 1,100-1,200 shows in NYC, with a handful of shows in Chicago and Baltimore
  • I’ve covered about a dozen or more festivals, including traveling to Montreal for M for Montreal back in 2019. 
  • I’ve been a panelist at Mondo.NYC Festival and at New Colossus Festival, speaking about PR, promotion and press for indie artists, giving my perspective as a indie blogger. 
  • A few years ago, I made a cameo in a JOVM mainstay’s music video. It’s a very noticeable spot towards the end of the video. It was a fun experience, but so far no one has called me about acting gigs. Maybe I need to stick to the writing and photography? 
  • I couldn’t have imagined photographing George ClintonPatti LaBelleSnoop DoggBlondieNile RodgersRoky EricksonPhilip BaileyBlind Boys of Alabama and so many others, as well as this site’s countless mainstays.
  • I wouldn’t have met the countless colleagues and musicians, who have become supporters and friends. And by far, music friends have proven to be the very best of friends. 

JOVM turned 10 in June 2020. And during the middle of the very worst of the pandemic, things seemed — understandably — bleak. And although we’re slowly managed to claw our way back to a degree of normalcy, in which gathering together can happen, things across the music industry still seem rather bleak: Touring has always been a big financial risk for musicians but COVID-19 has made it even more complicated, because musicians are out there risking their health and lives — because they need to make money to live. 

We’re all trying to figure out how to maneuver in a new, confusing and uncertain landscape that may well be with us for an indefinite period of time. But with these past 12 years under my belt, I have no intentions of going anywhere. 

I strongly believe that I’ve managed to carve out a unique spot in the blogosphere, a place that I feel is desperately necessary because both the music and media worlds are often so incredibly homogenous. Someone out there has to do something different. And representation in every aspect matters. So in many ways, this has to continue. 

As I do every month, I want to thank the following folks and organizations. Without them this past few years — and especially this year — wouldn’t have been remotely possible: 

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

All of those folks have been generous Patreon patrons. Of course, feel free to check out the Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement. And if you’re able to support, your support will be greatly appreciated and continuously shouted out. Any amount really helps. Seriously. 

I must thank the folks at Creatives Rebuild New York. I’m relieved, proud and humbled to be included in their Guaranteed Income for Artists program. The money I’ll receive over the next 18 months will be put to good use — keeping this little dream of mine going. I don’t think there’s enough words to thank them — or to show how grateful I am. (I’ll keep trying, of course!) 

There are other ways you can support. 

You can also support by checking the JOVM shop: https://www.joyofviolentmovement.com/shop 

You can also support my following me on the following platforms:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/william_ruben_helms 

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/yankee32879 and https://www.twitter.com/joyofviolent 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

And you can hire me for headshots, portraits and events. Seriously, I’m available for that, too. You can click here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/ny/new-york/william-h?duration=1?duration=1# or you can contact me directly.

12 years ago this month, I started what has been for me — my life’s work.

And honestly, when I started this site, I couldn’t have imagined three-quarters of the things I’ve done and experienced over JOVM’s history to ever happen.

  • I’ve covered roughly 1,100-1,200 shows in NYC, with a handful of shows in Chicago and Baltimore
  • I’ve covered about a dozen or more festivals, including traveling to Montreal for M for Montreal back in 2019. 
  • I’ve been a panelist at Mondo.NYC Festival and at New Colossus Festival, speaking about PR, promotion and press for indie artists, giving my perspective as a indie blogger. 
  • A few years ago, I made a cameo in a JOVM mainstay’s music video. It’s a very noticeable spot towards the end of the video. It was a fun experience, but so far no one has called me about acting gigs. Maybe I need to stick to the writing and photography? 
  • I couldn’t have imagined photographing George ClintonPatti LaBelleSnoop Dogg, BlondieNile RodgersRoky EricksonPhilip BaileyBlind Boys of Alabama and so many others, as well as this site’s countless mainstays.
  • I wouldn’t have met the countless colleagues and musicians, who have become supporters and friends. And by far, music friends have proven to be the very best of friends. 

JOVM turned 10 in June 2020. And during the middle of the very worst of the pandemic, things seemed — understandably — bleak. And although we’re slowly managed to claw our way back to a degree of normalcy, in which gathering together can happen, things across the music industry still seem rather bleak: Touring has always been a big financial risk for musicians but COVID-19 has made it even more complicated, because musicians are out there risking their health and lives — because they need to make money to live.

We’re all trying to figure out how to maneuver in a new, confusing and uncertain landscape that may well be with us for an indefinite period of time. But with these past 12 years under my belt, I have no intentions of going anywhere.

I strongly believe that I’ve managed to carve out a unique spot in the blogosphere, a place that I feel is desperately necessary because both the music and media worlds are often so incredibly homogenous. Someone out there has to do something different. And representation in every aspect matters. So in many ways, this has to continue.

As I do every month, I want to thank the following folks and organizations. Without them this past few years — and especially this year — wouldn’t have been remotely possible:

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

All of those folks have been generous Patreon patrons. Of course, feel free to check out the Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement. And if you’re able to support, your support will be greatly appreciated and continuously shouted out. Any amount really helps. Seriously.

I must thank the folks at Creatives Rebuild New York. I’m relieved, proud and humbled to be included in their Guaranteed Income for Artists program. The money I’ll receive over the next 18 months will be put to good use — keeping this little dream of mine going. I don’t think there’s enough words to thank them — or to show how grateful I am. (I’ll keep trying, of course!)

There are other ways you can support.

You can also support by checking the JOVM shop: https://www.joyofviolentmovement.com/shop 

You can also support my following me on the following platforms:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/william_ruben_helms 

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/yankee32879 and https://www.twitter.com/joyofviolent 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

And you can hire me for headshots, portraits and events. Seriously, I’m available for that, too. You can click here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/ny/new-york/william-h?duration=1?duration=1# or you can contact me directly.

Melbourne-based punk rockers and JOVM mainstays Amyl and The Sniffers recently wrapped up their first Stateside tour in three years, a tour that saw the Aussie outfit playing some of their largest shows to date, including sets at Coachella, Shaky Knees and Brooklyn Steel, as well as their late night, Stateside TV debut on Late Night with Seth Meyers.

Photo credit: Jamie Wdziekonsk

The JOVM mainstays will be turning to the States this fall to play the biggest venues they’ve ever played. The tour includes a September 23, 2022 stop at Terminal 5 and one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Vic Theatre on September 28, 2022.

I caught them at Brooklyn Steel last month and the band is a must see. So if you live near any of these tour stops — and even if you don’t — cop some tickets y’all and catch Amy Taylor and her Sniffers destroy your eardrums. Ticket presale begins June 15, 2022 at 10:00am local time and the general on-sale begins June 17, 2022 at 10:00am local time.

As always, tour dates below. And you can get those tickets here: https://www.amylandthesniffers.com/shows

Tour dates

9/18/22 – Primavera Sound – Los Angeles, CA

9/20/22 – Brooklyn Bowl – Nashville, TN

9/21/22 – Variety Playhouse – Atlanta, GA

9/23/22 – Terminal 5 – NYC

9/24/22 – 9:30 Club – Washington, D.C.

9/25/22 – Big Night Live – Boston, MA

9/27/22 – Majestic Theatre – Detroit, MI

9/28/22 – Vic Theatre – Chicago, IL

9/29/22 – First Avenue – Minneapolis, MN

10/1/22 – Ogden Theatre – Denver, CO

10/2/22 – The Depot – Salt Lake City, UT

10/4/22 – Knitting Factory – Boise, ID

10/5/22 – Sessions Music Hall – Eugene, OR

10/6/22 – Showbox Sodo – Seattle, WA

10/9/22 – Ohana Encore Weekend – Dana Point, CA

The ideas behind Creatives Rebuild New York (CRNY) aren’t new — but the sense of urgency behind its implementation is very new: Inspired by the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) Artists Project of 1978-1980, Creatives Rebuild New York is an extension of Mellon Foundation President Elizabeth Alexander’s work on the Governor Cuomo’s Reimagine New York Commission in 2021, created as a response to the Coronavirus pandemic. The initiative was further developed in collaboration with Emil J. Kang, Program, Director for Arts and Culture and Creatives Rebuild New York’s Executive Director Sarah Calderon, who was previously managing director of ArtPlace America.

Creatives Rebuild New York officially launched last Spring, as part of a growing national movement of broad-based employment programs that put artists back to work. All of these vital relief programs have helped thousands of artists maintain their artistic practices and maintain their livelihoods while mitigating financial disaster, heavily influenced by the pandemic.

Rooted in the belief that improving the lives of artists is paramount to the vitality of New York State’s collective social and economic well-being, Creative Rebuild New York’s programs build further upon COVID-19 relief, to envision longer-term, sustainable opportunities for artists across the State.

Sponsored by Tides Center and funded The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Ford Foundation and The Stavros Niachros Foundation, Creatives Rebuild New York has two programs as part of its mission:

  • CRNY’s Artist Employment Program (AEP): A 2-year program that will fund employment for 300 artists working collaboration with community-based organizations across New York State. Participating artist will receive a salary of $65,000 per year (commensurate with the median household income in the state), plus benefits and decimated time to focus on their artistic practice. Community-based organizations will receive $25,000-$100,000 per year to support their collaboration with those artists.
  • CRNY’s Guaranteed Income for Artists: An 18-month program that will provide, regular, no-strings attached cash payments for artists in the state, who have — and of course, show — financial need. Each artist selected receives $1,000 per month. The Guaranteed Income for Artists program aims to help artists meet their basic needs outside of traditional or merit-based grants. This program, is part of a larger national discussion that municipalities, policymakers, community leaders and activities across the country are engaging in about guaranteed income and economic stability for those, who are living with financial need.

Late last year, I came across a friend and colleague’s Instagram story, which mentioned Creatives Rebuild New York. I looked up their website and immediately saved their homepage on my browser history and began following them on Facebook. Back in February, they opened up applications to the public — and I put in an application as quickly as I could.

Some 60,000 artists and creatives applied. In mid April, I learned that I was pre-selected for the Guaranteed Income for Artists program. After going through a detailed background and income check, I got an email the other day from CRNY that said that I was one of those 2,400 folks receiving the income grant. I actually needed a few days to put my thoughts together because I was feeling a lot of different things – – including, relief, vindication, pride, satisfaction.

This money will help me continue my work with JOVM — and for that, I feel it’ll be life changing. I’m so grateful for the opportunity and I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure that CRNY won’t regret it. So, thank you folks at Creatives Rebuild New York. Thank you so very much.

Covering music from all over the world — through write-ups on new releases, interviews and live music coverage — has been the heart and soul of JOVM since the very beginning, 12 years ago next month. I’ve always believed that was a much-needed purpose and place for JOVM in the larger blogosphere. And that sense of purpose has pushed me forward through a number of various personal and socioeconomic events, including a pandemic.

With the various COVID-19 variants and sub-variants floating around out there, the best and safest thing you can do for everyone involved — bands, tour crew, venue staff and yourself — is to continue to wear masks. You’ll ensure that bands, who desperately need to tour to live, can actually work and live. 

Because this site has long been a DIY labor of love, I’ve often felt that I’ve had an intimate and personal understanding of the emotional and financial plight of many of the artists I’ve covered throughout this site’s almost 12 year history. 12 years at anything is a long fucking time — especially in the blogosphere. 

With such highly unusual circumstances, countless people — artists included — have been forced into deep reflection. In my line of work, I’ve had countless on-the-record and off-the-record conversations about being an artist and trying to make a living off your art. All of those conversations constantly remind of some very necessary facts: 

  • Art costs money to produce — and without money, it can’t exist because it can’t be produced. 
  • Artists are small businesses. So supporting an artist is supporting a small business. 
  • A small bit of support can go a long way. A $20, $30, $40, $50 or $60 purchase of someone’s work can often mean the purchase of groceries, paying their bills or even the confidence that they can continue with their art.
  • Your individual $20, $50 or $60 purchase doesn’t really mean shit to Jeff Bezos, Amazon, Walmart or any of the other major conglomerates. 
  • Supporting a local artist/small business can keep money within your community. Caring about your community and ensuring that your hardworking neighbors can make and spend money within your neighborhood makes your neighborhood vital. 
  • Amazon and the other mega-conglomerates don’t give a fuck about your community or your neighbors. 
  • Lastly, you won’t be giving your money to companies that actively fuck over their neighbors, the environment or their employees. And that alone should make you feel better about the decision. 

Of course, I hope that JOVM — and my work with JOVM — has led you to artists and bands whose work as become a part of your lives, as they have become a part of mine. And i also hope that my photography has managed to add some beauty to your day; inspired you to see the world in a new light; or make you go out to see some of these artists live. 

In these difficult times, I’m asking you, dear readers and friends for your support. And there’s a number of ways that you can support JOVM:  

  • You can buy prints — from my live concert photography to street photography and even some outdoor/nature photos. I also still have a shit ton of JOVM bumper stickers. All of this stuff is beautiful and could use a loving forever home. You can check out the store here: https://joyofviolentmovement.com/shop/
  • You can support by becoming one of my Patreon patrons. Every dollar means something. Seriously, it does. There are different patronage levels and different rewards for your support. For more information, you can check out the Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

Of course, while I’m on the subject: I want to send shout outs to those folks, who have supported me and my work throughout the past year with their patronage on Patreon. 

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

Thank you, y’all. Your support means so very much. 

If you’re in the NYC area, you can hire me for photography work. Seriously. I do headshots, portraits and event photography. You can hire me through Photobooker. My listing is here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/8582abd8-f01e-43eb-b2be-0ed57157687e?duration=1?duration=1 (If you’re outside the NYC area and you’d still want to hire me, we can talk.) 

If you’re not already a fan of this site on Facebook, please feel free to become a fan here: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

Right now, a lot of people out there are struggling to survive. Believe me, I get it and I’m empathetic to that. The past 18 months have been the most difficult and desperate for a lot of us. To that end, here are some other ways you can support JOVM: 

  • If you dig what I do: Keep reading! Please, keep reading!
  • Pass the word on to friends, family members, associates and anyone else, who will support independent journalism, music and criticism. 
  • Retweets, Facebook shares and reblog things you might dig. Sites need active eyeballs and clicks to survive. Every pair of eyeballs reading and clicking on JOVM means some ad revenue in the coffers. And those hardworking artists I cover will also be grateful for your love and support, too. 
  • Towards the bottom third of every post, there’s a related post section. If you dug the post you’re looking at it, feel free to check out the related posts. You might find something else you could love. 

I’m hoping that 2022 will be an even better year for all of us — and that y’all will continue to stick with JOVM and me in the 12th year and beyond.

As I’ve mentioned in a couple of previous posts, I’ve been in Baltimore over the past couple of days visiting family — and as a result, my posting schedule has been at best sporadic. I’ve had a great time; had some great food. And I covered a show here. But I’ll be back to fairly regular posting within the next couple of days. . . .

Writing about new releases from all over the world has been at the heart of JOVM since I started it almost 12 years ago. I’ve long believed that there was a much-needed purpose and place for JOVM in the larger blogosphere — and because of that, I’ve managed to boldly continue forward through a number of various personal and socioeconomic events, including a pandemic.

It seems that there are several different COVID-19 variants and sub-variants out there. Out of an abundance of caution, I’ve been covering as many shows as I can and continuing with my life as much as I can while being as safe as I can: I’m still masking at indoors shows and I strongly suggest that you should do so too for just a bit longer. Many friends, colleagues and associates wound up contracting COVID while attending some of the year’s first festivals.

The best and safest thing you can do for everyone involved — bands, tour crew, venue staff and yourself — is to continue to wear masks. You’ll ensure that bands, who desperately need to tour to live, can actually work and live.

Because this site has long been a DIY labor of love, I’ve often felt that I’ve had an intimate and personal understanding of the emotional and financial plight of many of the artists I’ve covered throughout this site’s almost 12 year history. 12 years at anything is a long fucking time — especially in the blogosphere. 

With such highly unusual circumstances, countless people — artists included — have been forced into deep reflection. In my line of work, I’ve had countless on-the-record and off-the-record conversations about being an artist and trying to make a living off your art. All of those conversations constantly remind of some very necessary facts: 

  • Art costs money to produce — and without money, it can’t exist because it can’t be produced. 
  • Artists are small businesses. So supporting an artist is supporting a small business. 
  • A small bit of support can go a long way. A $20, $30, $40, $50 or $60 purchase of someone’s work can often mean the purchase of groceries, paying their bills or even the confidence that they can continue with their art.
  • Your individual $20, $50 or $60 purchase doesn’t really mean shit to Jeff Bezos, Amazon, Walmart or any of the other major conglomerates. 
  • Supporting a local artist/small business can keep money within your community. Caring about your community and ensuring that your hardworking neighbors can make and spend money within your neighborhood makes your neighborhood vital. 
  • Amazon and the other mega-conglomerates don’t give a fuck about your community or your neighbors. 
  • Lastly, you won’t be giving your money to companies that actively fuck over their neighbors, the environment or their employees. And that alone should make you feel better about the decision. 

Of course, I hope that JOVM — and my work with JOVM — has led you to artists and bands whose work as become a part of your lives, as they have become a part of mine. And i also hope that my photography has managed to add some beauty to your day; inspired you to see the world in a new light; or make you go out to see some of these artists live. 

In these difficult times, I’m asking you, dear readers and friends for your support. And there’s a number of ways that you can support JOVM:  

  • You can buy prints — from my live concert photography to street photography and even some outdoor/nature photos. I also still have a shit ton of JOVM bumper stickers. All of this stuff is beautiful and could use a loving forever home. You can check out the store here: https://joyofviolentmovement.com/shop/
  • You can support by becoming one of my Patreon patrons. Every dollar means something. Seriously, it does. There are different patronage levels and different rewards for your support. For more information, you can check out the Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

Of course, while I’m on the subject: I want to send shout outs to those folks, who have supported me and my work throughout the past year with their patronage on Patreon. 

Sash

Alice Northover

Bella Fox

Jenny MacRostie

Janene Otten 

Thank you, y’all. Your support means so very much. 

If you’re in the NYC area, you can hire me for photography work. Seriously. I do headshots, portraits and event photography. You can hire me through Photobooker. My listing is here: https://www.photobooker.com/photographer/8582abd8-f01e-43eb-b2be-0ed57157687e?duration=1?duration=1 (If you’re outside the NYC area and you’d still want to hire me, we can talk.) 

If you’re not already a fan of this site on Facebook, please feel free to become a fan here: https://www.facebook.com/TheJoyofViolentMovement

Right now, a lot of people out there are struggling to survive. Believe me, I get it and I’m empathetic to that. The past 18 months have been the most difficult and desperate for a lot of us. To that end, here are some other ways you can support JOVM: 

  • If you dig what I do: Keep reading! Please, keep reading!
  • Pass the word on to friends, family members, associates and anyone else, who will support independent journalism, music and criticism. 
  • Retweets, Facebook shares and reblog things you might dig. Sites need active eyeballs and clicks to survive. Every pair of eyeballs reading and clicking on JOVM means some ad revenue in the coffers. And those hardworking artists I cover will also be grateful for your love and support, too. 
  • Towards the bottom third of every post, there’s a related post section. If you dug the post you’re looking at it, feel free to check out the related posts. You might find something else you could love. 

I’m hoping that 2022 will be an even better year for all of us — and that y’all will continue to stick with JOVM and me in the 12th year and beyond.