Category: industrial

French electronic duo Nomenklatür — Olivier”Labinsect” Rossi and Olivier “Mitch” Brucker — have similar backgrounds as raver kids and DJs in the mid 90s: Brucker has long been influenced by EBM and industrial techno while Rossi is a product of the techno scene. The duo initially met at wolrld renowned Berlin-based nightclub Berghain; but they didn’t start collaborating together until 2005.

With Nomenklatür, Rossi and Brucker have displayed their seemingly undying devotion to synths of every era, both analog and digital while seamlessly fusing their influences and sounds into something completely new. Their first two releases, their self-released debut EP and their full-length debut Gift of Ages were released to critical applause. Gift of Ages hinted at their multifaceted sound: The album’s material featured elements of EBM, techno, tech-pop and New Wave.

The duo went on a wildly prolific period that saw them exploring techno and tech house rhythms without diverging from their influences. Through a series of EPs, remixes and albums, the duo began to explore the many nuances of techno, pushing the boundaries of the genre as far as they could. The duo expanded upon their profile in the electronic music scene with live shows at Parisian clubs like The Rex Club, Batofar, and La Machine du Moulin Rouge, and then to clubs in Belgium and Switzerland. They also had their work remixed by Kiko, David Carretta, and Commuter. And they collaborated with Montreal underground scene star Mimi.

The French duo began a decided focus on melody, bolstered by progressive production, which caught the attention of German label Beachcoma, who signed them and released an EP in 2020. During pandemic lockdowns last August, the duo remixed Odge’s “Sad Love Song,” which led to the singer/songwriter collaborating with the French production duo on their latest EP When The Wind Blows. Released earlier this month through Clivage Music, the EP’s material sees the duo drawing from Kraftwerk, Depeche Mode, The Chemical Brothers, Plastikman, classic Detroit and Berlin techno, coldwave, ambient electronica and sci fi.

When The Wind Blows‘ latest single, EP title track “When The Wind Blows” is a slickly produced, propulsive and darkly seductive bit of house centered around scorching synth oscillation, skittering thump and Odge’s sultry delivery paired with razor sharp hooks. The end result is a song that sees the collaborators meshing elements of house music, industrial, techno. electro pop and goth into a certified club banger with a dreamy and uneasy quality.

Hi The Joy of Violent Movement, Nomenklatür will release its new EP in a week. Mysterious, intense and bewitching, this new project somewhere between electroclash, techno and synthpop let us into the hypnotic world of this french duo. The track When the Wind Blows is the first extract of this EP coming on October 18th and will be accompanied by a video clip. Do you think a relay of this release would be possible on your website? Cheers Tiphaine Citizen Records

New EP When The Wind Blows coming on October 18th on Clivage Music

Bio

The room was damp and hot, red-lit bodies swayed as if in a trance, strobe lights spattered… In this concrete domain the night continued, helmed by famous German label Ostgut, in the mythical place now known as… Berghain.

New Audio: Ottawa’s Antigen Shift Shares a New Banger

Ottawa-based industrial/post-industrial/noise synth duo Antigen Shift — Nicholas Theriault and Jarius Khan — formed over a decade ago. And over the course of five albums, three EPs and a handful of remixes and compilation appearances, the Ottawa-based duo’s sound has evolved. “We started as a straight-up industrial power noise project, but evolved into a more diverse, complex post-industrial project,” Antigen Shifts Nicholas Theriault explains.

The Canadian duo’s latest single “Sugar and Stamps” is a accessible industrial banger featuring layers upon layers of buzzing and scorching synths, thumping beats and walls of industrial clang and clatter that sonically brings Nine Inch Nails, Ministry, and Fat of the Land-era The Prodigy to mind.

New Video: Flossing Shares Sultry and Menacing “All We Are”

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck and sideswiped everything, Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter and musician Heather Elle found themselves thrown from touring with buzz-worthy post-punk outfit The Wants (f.k.a. as BODEGA) and into a dizzying state of long overdue decompression. Aching to artistically progress, Elle felt the need to completely untether from both personal and professional entanglements: They left The Wants and a long-term relationship and quickly began writing and recording songs in their new bachelorette pad.

Elle dug up five-year old songs and song ideas written on the road and unexpectedly wrote last year’s confessional and hedonistic “Switch,” which pushed the Brooklyn-based artist to take their Flossing project further. Elle’s Flossing debut, Queen of the Mall EP was released to critical praise with critics describing the Brooklyn-based artist as a “mischievous pop poet” and the “newly appointed master of psychological provocative.”

Building upon growing buzz, Elle’s sophomore EP World Of Mirth is slated for an August 26, 2022 release through London-based Brace Yourself Records. The soon-to-be released EP continues the Brooklyn-based artist’s for being enigmatic and provocative, while excavating and proving into the self even further than before.

World Of Mirth‘s latest single, the smoldering “All We Are.” Centered around densely layered, tweeter and woofer rattling, Nine Inch Nails-meets-ADULT.-like industrial production paired with Elle’s alternating cooing and howling, “All We Are” is possess a sultry yet menacing quality that’s simultaneously irresistible and uneasy.

“Inspired by binge-watching Steven Soderbergh’s medical drama series The Knick at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic — which is set in an ER in turn-of-the-century New York City — the song invokes themes of metaphysics, existentialism, pride, competition, and legacy,” Elle explains in press notes. “‘This is all we are,’ is the final line from the lead surgeon as he operates upon himself in front of a stadium of colleagues and doctors, attempting to outsmart death.”

Directed by Dylan Brannigan, the accompanying video for “All We Are” is shot through grainy VHS fuzz and emphasizes the song’s sultry yet menacing air.

Poltergeist is a young, mysterious French producer, who quickly emerged into the French electronic and industrial scenes with his debut single “Ich bin ein Kämpfer.” 

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The emerging French producers full-length debut is slated for release next month — and if you’ve been frequenting this site throughout this past month, you may recall that I wrote about the Depeche Mode — or a goth take on Kraftwerk-like “La Grand Dame,” an infectious banger that captures a deep-seated existential terror.

“Der Nachtvogel,” the woozy, latest single from the French producer’s full-length debut is centered around thumping kick drum, skittering beats, dense layers of arpeggiated synths paired with the French producer’s insouciantly delivered lyrics, and continues another run of club friendly, goth/industrial bangers seemingly indebted to early Depeche Mode.

New Audio: Liz Lamere Returns with a Club Friendly Banger

Liz Lamere is a New York-based singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, who has had a lengthy career playing drums in several local punk bands — and famously for collaborating with her late partner, the legendary Alan Vega on his solo work for the better part of three decades. 

Lamere finally steps out into the spotlight as a solo artist with her solo debut Keep It Alive. Written and performed entirely by Lamere, Keep It Alive was recorded in the Lower Manhattan apartment she shared with Vega during pandemic-related lockdowns — in the same space where the Suicide frontman constructed his light sculptures. Keeping it a family affair, the album was engineered by Vega and Lamere’s son, Dante Vega Lamere. Keep It Alive was co-produced by Lamere and The Vacant Lots‘ Jared Artaud. 

“There’s something very magical about creating music in the same environment where Alan created his visual art,” Liz Lamere says in press notes. “His energy is pervasive and is inevitably infused in the recordings.” She continues “ We were living through unprecedented times and Keep It Alive took adversity and uncertainty and turned it into a message of resilience and empowerment.”

The album’s material reportedly courses with the bold and defiant energy that motivated a young Lamere through her early double life as a Wall Street lawyer by day and a downtown New York musician, before she met and fell in love with Vega. Her relationship with Vega led to her becoming his manager, creative foil and keyboardist on his solo work including albums like Deuce AvenuePower On To Zero HourNew RaceionDugong Prang2007Station and IT, as well as the posthumously released, lost album Mutator, which led to the Vega Vault, which she curates with Jared Artaud. 

After Vega’s death in July 2016, Lamere found it cathartic to write down thoughts and observations in notebooks. Simultaneously, she and Artaud had started working together on overseeing the mastering of IT and the production and mixing of Mutator. During this very busy period, the pair discussed working together on her own solo material. 

Keep It Alive is a homage to a song on her late husband’s New Raceion that has a deep and significant meaning for her. It was one of the key lines she would chant on stage, becoming a staple of their live performances together. The main theme and vision of the album is preserving your own inner fire. “Alan always encouraged me to make my own music, and I’ve waited until the time was right as I’ve been dedicated to preserving Alan’s vision and building his legacy,” Lamere says. 

Over the past month or so I’ve written about two of Keep It Alive‘s released singles:

  • Lights Out,” a swaggering banger featuring tweeter and woofer rattling 808s, glistening and melodic synth washes paired with Lamere’s coolly delivered boxing and fighting metaphors. While centered around a gritty and familiar, in-your-face, New York aggression, “Lights Out” is an upbeat, life-affirming song that will give you the energy to keep on fighting the necessary and good fight. 
  • Freedom’s Last Call” a brooding and cinematic track centered around thumping industrial beats, jagged and ominous synth arpeggios and a menacing bass line paired with Lamere’s icy delivery. Sonically, “Freedom’s Last Call” sounds as though it could have been part of the Blade Runner soundtrack — or the soundtrack of almost any John Carpenter film. 

“Sin” Keep It Alive‘s third and latest single is centered around glistening and oscillating synths, a sinuous bass line and tweeter and woofer rattling beats paired with Lamere’s sultry and plaintive delivery and her uncanny ability to craft an infectious, razor sharp hook. While, “Sin” sonically bears a resemblance to a slick synthesis of Depeche Mode and New Order, the song’s narrator has a unique, non-moralistic, non-Christian view of sin — one that seems to say that sin is just one part of the human experience.

“‘Sin’ is loosely inspired by Dante’s Inferno and the search for meaning in the journey of life,” Lamere explains. “The message is one of redemption, as sin is not always evil, but rather offers a glimpse into the dark side of the human condition. For me the song is more about not letting the judgment of others, of good and evil, hold you back from fully experiencing life.  Ultimately, I hope the listener will interpret the song and find meaning in their own way.”

Keep It Alive is slated for May 20, 2022 release through In The Red.

Lyric Video: Liz Lamere Shares a Brooding, Post-Apocalyptic Single

Liz Lamere is a New York-based singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, who has had a lengthy career playing drums in several local punk bands — and famously for collaborating with her late partner, the legendary Alan Vega on his solo work for the better part of three decades. 

Lamere finally steps out into the spotlight as a solo artist with her solo debut Keep It Alive. Written and performed entirely by Lamere, Keep It Alive was recorded in the Lower Manhattan apartment she shared with Vega during pandemic-related lockdowns — in the same space where the Suicide frontman constructed his light sculptures. Keeping it a family affair, the album was engineered by Vega and Lamere’s son, Dante Vega Lamere. Keep It Alive was co-produced by Lamere and The Vacant Lots‘ Jared Artaud. 

“There’s something very magical about creating music in the same environment where Alan created his visual art,” Liz Lamere says in press notes. “His energy is pervasive and is inevitably infused in the recordings.” She continues “ We were living through unprecedented times and Keep It Alive took adversity and uncertainty and turned it into a message of resilience and empowerment.”

The album’s material reportedly courses with the bold and defiant energy that motivated a young Lamere through her early double life as a Wall Street lawyer by day and a downtown New York musician, before she met and fell in love with Vega. Her relationship with Vega led to her becoming his manager, creative foil and keyboardist on his solo work including albums like Deuce AvenuePower On To Zero HourNew RaceionDugong Prang2007Station and IT, as well as the posthumously released, lost album Mutator, which led to the Vega Vault, which she curates with Jared Artaud. 

After Vega’s death in July 2016, Lamere found it cathartic to write down thoughts and observations in notebooks. Simultaneously, she and Artaud had started working together on overseeing the mastering of IT and the production and mixing of Mutator. During this very busy period, the pair discussed working together on her own solo material. 

Keep It Alive is a homage to a song on her late husband’s New Raceion that has a deep and significant meaning for her. It was one of the key lines she would chant on stage, becoming a staple of their live performances together. The main theme and vision of the album is preserving your own inner fire. “Alan always encouraged me to make my own music, and I’ve waited until the time was right as I’ve been dedicated to preserving Alan’s vision and building his legacy,” Lamere says. 

Last month, I wrote about Keep It Alive‘s first single, “Lights Out,” a swaggering banger featuring tweeter and woofer rattling 808s, glistening and melodic synth washes paired with Lamere’s coolly delivered boxing and fighting metaphors. While centered around a gritty and familiar, in-your-face, New York aggression, “Lights Out” is an upbeat, life-affirming song that will give you the energy to keep on fighting the necessary and good fight. 

“’Lights Out’ was the very first track I wrote,” Lamere says in press notes. “You write about what you know. It’s boxing themed. When you step in the ring your life is literally on the line. ‘Let your hands go’ is a boxing term and my mantra for going full tilt in whatever I’ve set out to do.” 

Keep It Alive‘s second and latest single “Freedom’s Last Call” is a brooding and cinematic track centered around thumping industrial beats, jagged and ominous synth arpeggios and a menacing bass line paired with Lamere’s icy delivery. Sonically, “Freedom’s Last Call” sounds as though it could have been part of the Blade Runner soundtrack — or the soundtrack of almost any John Carpenter film.

“This track emerged from the post-apocalyptic vibe around all the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic and the political, social and media-driven upheaval and divisiveness,” Lamere explains. “Uncertainty of certainty. Freedom is the most elemental part of the human condition, which is now being assaulted from so many directions. The song is a call for unity and redemption, and about having one shot to keep hope, humanity and free will alive.”  

Keep It Alive is slated for May 20, 2022 release through In The Red.