Tag: The Black Fever

New Video: The Black Fever’s Old-Timey Visual for “Marketing”

With the release of 2010’s Romanticism, 2012’s Revisionist, 2014’s A Little Help EP and 2015’s Midnight Century, the Toronto-based post-punk act The Black Fever — Shoe (vocals, guitar), Pat Bramm (bass, backing vocals) and Dan Purpura (drums) — have firmly established a sleek and propulsive take on post punk that focuses on melody and concise songwriting.  

Recorded over two intense and breakneck recording sessions, their Ian Gomes-produced EP Unarticulated Wants was released earlier this year, and the EP’s first single is the hook-driven, Editors meets Radio 4-like “Marketing.” Centered around a propulsive and angular bass line, thunderous drumming and Shoe’s plaintive vocals, the track seethes with frustration over the fact that every single moment of daily life is inundated with advertisements. It’s inescapable and oppressive manipulation to convince you to spend early and often on that new shiny thing that will make you more attractive and more interesting to others, that will help you lose weight, restore your receding hair line, keep your erection, and just make you feel whole. And yet, there’s a gnawing emptiness that can’t be resolved by possessions or by spending. 

“We need to find a better balance between ads and public art — for art’s sake.” the band said in an emailed statement. Naturally, the song expresses a concern over what the over saturation of advertising and marketing messages does to the human soul and mind. 

The recently released video for “Marketing” is centered around incredibly manipulative stock footage of old commercials. Although the context for each commercial has been removed, each commercial is meant to make you feel something — envy, pleasure, lust. hunger, despair, all in the desperate attempt to get you to buy right now. And it should feel infuriating and fucked up. 

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The Black Fever are an up-and-coming Toronto-based post-punk act, currently featuring Shoe (vocals, guitar), Pat Bramm (bass, back-up vocals), and Dan Purpura (drums), and the band will be releasing their latest full-length album Unarticulated Wants on June 14, 2019. Reportedly, the album’s material thematically reflects the current sociopolitical moment — political instability, growing economic disparity and the everyday dramas of love and life.
The album’s latest single is the mid-tempo hook-driven track “No Work.” Centered around shimmering guitar lines, a motor groove consisting of thumping drumming and a sinus bass line, a slick yet forceful hook paired with Shoe’s plaintive vocals, “No Work” manages to recall Turn On The Bright Lights-era Interpol; but as the band notes, the song possesses  an underlying anxiety that comes from the difficulty that many people — in particular, new, college graduates and young professionals — have finding and keeping a decent job in which they could survive.

Over the course of three self-released albums 2010’s Romanticism, 2012’s Revisionist and 2015’s Midnight Century and 2014’s A Little Help EP, the Toronto, Ontario, Canada-based post-punk trio The Black Fever, comprised of Shoe (vocals, guitar), Pat Bramm (bass, backing vocals) and Dan Purpura (drums) have specialized in a sleek and propulsive post-punk that focuses on melody and concise songwriting.

Building upon that reputation, the band will be releasing a new Ian Gomes-produced EP during the spring that was recorded during two breakneck, twelve-hour recording sessions, and the EP’s first single, the Editors meets Radio 4-like “Marketing.” Centered around Shoe’s plaintive vocals, swirling guitars, angular bass and thunderous drumming, the song expresses a deep seated frustration over the fact that every single moment of your daily life is inundated with advertisements. As George Carlin once joked, someone is always trying to remove you from your money — and the constant attempts to convince  you to spend, spend, spend, spend on the unnecessary is oppressive. As the band says in a statement “We need to find a better balance between ads and public art — for art’s sake.” Throughout the song, there’s a concern over what the over-saturation of marketing messages does to the human soul and mind. Think about that as you go about your daily business.