Tag: The Hives

New Video: Sweden’s Blues Pills Releases an Explosive and Anthemic Ripper

Rapidly rising Örebro, Sweden-based rock quartet Blues Pills — founding members and primary songwriters Zack Anderson (guitar) and Elin Larsson (vocals), along with André Kvarnström (drums) and Kristoffer Schander (bass) — can trace their origins back to 2011. Shortly after their formation, the band quickly established a unique sound that drew from psych rock and the blues, which led to the band playing dirty and crowded bars to playing some of  Scandinavia’s largest festivals, including Download, Rock am Ring and Wacken open Air. 

Fueled by a restless desire for reinvention, the band went through a bit of a hiatus that eventually led to their third, full-length album Holy Moly! Slated for an August 21, 2020 release through Nuclear Blast Records, the self-produced and self-recorded album was recorded in the band’s self-built studio, located in  an abandoned factory in Nårke, Sweden, along with some assistance from The Hives’ Nicolaus Arson and Johan Gustafsson, and Rovljud Sound’s Martin Jacobsson — and the album sees the band returning toothier roots: gritty rock with a bit of soul. 

“Kiss My Past Goodbye,” Holy Moly!’s third and latest single is a raw and bluesy rock song centered around a funky, wah-wah pedaled riff, thunderous drumming, an enormous, arena rock friendly hook and Larsson’s soulful vocals, in a brash, zero fucks given tell off that sounds a bit like The Kills, The Hives and others. “‘Kiss My Past Goodbye’ is a song full of raw power, funky riffs and wild drumming,” Blues Pills’ Zack Anderson says in press notes. “It’s a clear message about moving on, staying true to yourself, and not drawing on your past.” 

The recently released video features the members of the band performing the song with some aptly psychedelic backdrops and filters. 

New Video: Denmark’s Twin Dive Releases a Surreal Visual for Mosh Pit Friendly Single “Holly”

Over the course of this past year, I’ve written a bit Aarhus, Denmark-based indie rock act Twin Dive. And as you may recall, the Danish alt rock act formed back in 2018 when its founding duo of Robert Jancevich (vocals, guitar) and Ragnar “Raggi” Gudmunds (drums)  met and bonded over a mutual passion for all things rock ‘n’ roll. Since then, the band has split their time between the studio and live gigs honing and polishing their sound while releasing material that has been compared favorably to Foo Fighters, The Hives and others. During that same period, Charlotte Mortensen (bass) joined the band, helping the band bolster their sound. 

Building upon a growing profile in their native Denmark and across Scandinavia, the band played at this year’s Spot Festival, which caught the attention of Drowned in Sound, who picked the band as one of the best acts of the festival — and they just recently finished a tour of Finland with Finnish act Ursus Factory. Earlier this year, I wrote about the grungy “Animal,” a track that recalls 120 Minutes-era alt rock — i.e., Alice in Chains, Stone Temple Pilots and the like — while thematically, the song was about knowing and taming one’s inner animal. 

The rapidly rising Danish trio’s latest single “Holly” continues a run of grungy, power chord-driven material that draws from 120 Minutes-era alt rock. In fact, because of an arrangement centered around heavily pedal effected and jagged power chords, thunderous drumming and howled vocals the band’s latest single may arguably be the most indebted to Bleach and In Utero-era Nirvana of their entire catalog — but at its core. the song explores the unending battle between our sense of self and our ego in a way that’s partially ironic. 

Directed by Mark Vesterlund, the recently released and incredibly cinematic video is a surreal fever dream featuring a troupe of older Asian women doing traditional dances to the song — and while it’s an odd juxtaposition, the visual is meant to leave the interpretation of its message and meaning to the  viewer. 

New Video: Up-and-Coming Danish Act Twin Dive Releases a Murky Lynchian Visual for “Animal”

Currently comprised of founding duo Robert Jancevich (vocals, guitar) and Ragnar “Raggi” Gudmunds (drums) and its newest member Charlotte Mortensen (bass) the up-and-coming Aarhus, Denmark-based indie rock act Twin Dive formed back in 2017 when its founding duo met and bonded over a mutual passion for all things rock ‘n’ roll.

Over the past year, the band has been in and out of the studio honing and polishing their sound and releasing material that has been compared to the likes of Foo Fighters, The Hives and others.They’ve also played a set at this year’s Spot Festival, which caught the attention of Drowned in Sound, who picked the band as one of the best acts of the festival — and they just recently finished a tour of Finland with Finnish act Ursus Factory. Building upon a growing profile, the act’s latest single “Animal” is a bluesy and sludgy power chord dirge that will immediately bring 120 Minutes-era alt rock — i.e., Alice in Chains, Stone Temple Pilots and the like — as it the song features a classic grunge rock song structure: quiet, loud, quiet. And while possessing a darkly seductive air, the song as the band notes is about knowing and taming one’s inner animal. Directed by filmmakers Mark Vesterlund and Peter Sorsensen at GoFat Productions, the recently released video is an unsettling and lysergic Lynchian nightmare — and it fits the eerie and murky air of the accompanying song. 

New Video: The Rah’s Return with an Ambitious and Enormous Arena Rock Friendly New Single

Last year, I wrote a bit about the up-and-coming  Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland-based quintet The Rah’s, and as you may recall, the band, which is comprised of founding members Jack McLeod, Jordan McIntyre and Neale Gray along with newest member Lee Brown have developed a regional reputation for an energetic live show but over the past few years, they’ve been experimenting with their sound and songwriting approach with singles like “Survival,” and “Take It All In” displaying a massive, Brit pop-like take on arena rock that to my ears brought Kasabian, The Hives, and Foo Fighters to mind. 

The Scottish indie rock quartet have been building upon their growing reputation for massive arena friendly Brit pop-styled rock, and their latest single, the swaggering “Land of the Dreamers” is centered around enormous power chords, thunderous drumming and a rousingly anthemic, shout-along worthy hook. Arguably, the song may be the most self-assured and ambitious song they’ve written, as it reveals a band with bold ambitions to take over the world while blowing out your eardrums. Filmed and edited by L.B. Coronado, the recently released video features the band broodingly exploring the wood and seaside, including some trippy footage shot with drones.

Comprised of Reid MacMaster (vocals, guitar), Sean Hackl (guitar, vocals), Duncan Briggs (bass, vocals) and Owen Wolff (drums, vocals), the Toronto, Ontario, Canada-based indie rock/garage rock act Fade Awaays have emerged as one of their hometown’s up-and-coming acts, thanks in part to a reputation for rowdy live sets centered around material with enormous, arena rock friendly choruses and hooks and fuzzy, 90s grunge rock-like power chords. In fact, the band has played some of Toronto’s most famed and beloved venues including Horseshoe Tavern, Mod Club Theatre and The Danforth Music Hall, have opened for the likes of Wolf Alice, Public Access TV, Hot Flash Heat Wave and The Sherlocks. And building upon a growing profile, the band has played sets at some of Canada’s largest music festivals including CMW, NXNE, Trapdoor Fest and Indie Week.

The Canadian band’s debut single “Get Along” is a gritty and anthemic garage rock barn-burner, complete with distortion heavy power chords, thundering drumming, howled vocals and a mosh-pit friendly, shout worthy hook. And while the song sounds as though it were indebted to The Hives and others, the song as the band says “is about trying to make the best of a situation and trying to get along with the ones you love in hard times.” Certainly, in light of our current sociopolitical moment, the urgent song is centered around a much-needed message for anyone trying to survive our mad, mad, mad, mad world.

As the band adds, the song was a last minute addition to their growing repertoire. “We wrote the arrangement for the song and sat on the lyrics for the rest of our days in the studio. I can’t even remember what we were trying to write the lyrics about because it took us way too long. Nothing felt right – it felt too rushed to be interesting but eventually we ended up writing lyrics about our situation, trying to get work done and how to work together in the studio. ‘I hope we get along / staying lazy ain’t no job couch driven trying to get along.’ It felt more accurate, natural, and engaging.”

 

 

New Video: Scotland’s The Rah’s Return with a Boisterous and Swaggering Brit Pop-Inspired Single

Last month, I wrote about the up-and-coming  Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland-based quintet The Rah’s, and as you may recall, the band which is comprised of founding members Jack McLeod, Jordan McIntyre, Neale Gray and Andrew McLeod, along with newest member Lee Brown have developed a regional reputation for an energetic live show but over the past few years, they’ve been experimenting with their sound and songwriting approach; in fact, “Survival,” was a massive, power-chord based bit of arena rock that sounded as though it were inspired by Kasabian, The Hives, and Foo Fighters. Unsurprisingly, their latest single “Take It All In” follows in a similar vein as its predecessor, thanks to the band’s use of enormous, arena rock power chords and rousing hooks, it also reveals a young band finding a renewed swagger while growing into a unique take of a familiar and beloved sound.

The recently released video continues the band’s ongoing collaboration with Carousel Films finds the band, their friend and associates sneaking into an empty mansion for a live party — in which the band plays — and then quickly sneaking out into the night, presumably before the police show up.

New Video: Introducing the Swaggering Arena Rock Friendly Sounds of Scotland’s The Rah’s

The Rah’s are an up-and-coming Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland-based quintet, comprised of founding members Jack McLeod, Jordan McIntyre, Neale Gray and Andrew McLeod, along with newest member Lee Brown, who have cited Jimi Hendrix, Arctic Monkeys, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones — and while regionally, they’ve developed a reputation for an energetic live show, over the past few years they’ve been experimenting with their sound and songwriting approach with the result being their anthemic, 90s Brit Pop “Survival,” a massive power chord-based single that sounds inspired by the likes of Kasabian, The Hives, and Foo Fighters.

Filmed and edited by Carousel Films, the recently released video for “Survival” features the band performing over superimposed stock footage of political and social unrest, war, climate change and destruction — all of which echo our current world in an uncanny fashion.

Initially formed in San Francisco, CA and now Los Angeles, CA-based indie rock quartet Jet Trash — currently comprised of Paul Kemp (vocals, rhythm guitar), Keith Shughrou (lead guitar), Marshall Fassino (bass, vocals) and their newest member Eric Peters (drums) — have a developed a reputation for crafting gritty, garage rock-inspired rock. And if you had been frequenting this site for the past couple of years, you may recall that I wrote about the blistering “Baby C’mon,” and the New Wave-leaning “Photography Is Over” off  2015’s self-titled EP.

Now, it’s been a while since I’ve personally heard about them; but as it turns out after touring to support their self-titled EP, the band relocated to Los Angeles and went through a lineup change before writing and recording their Alex Newport-produced follow-up Shake at Elliot Smith’s old studio, New Monkey Studio. Slated for a May 12, 2017 release, the EP’s first single, EP title track “Shake” is simply put, no frills, old fashioned, balls to the wall, power chord-based rock that nods at The Hives — i.e., “Hate to Say I Told You So” — as it possesses a feral, snarling explosiveness.

 

 

 

 

 

New Video: The Psychedelic Visuals for Plague Vendor’s Punchy and Anthemic “ISUA”

Much like the material on Free to Eat, the material off their latest effort Blooddsweat is comprised of material that had been written, revised, road-tested, further revised and re-imagined before the members of the quarter went into the studio. Produced and engineered by Stuart Sikes, best known for his work with The Walkman, Cat Power and Modest Mouse, Sikes encouraged the band to embrace a minimalist production with each member aiming to capture each track, each note in as a few takes as humanly possible and with little to no overdubs. Ultimately, the intent was to have their recorded sound hew as closely as possible to their live sound. Interestingly, Bloodsweat thematically is inspired by the last couple of years of each bandmember’s life, and the dedication and sacrifices being a serious artist must make and how that’s influenced them as a band as people. And when you listen to tracks on the album, it’s evident that their sound has grown, it’s also evident that their sound is still subtly influenced by At the Drive-In, Liars, The Cramps and others.

The album’s first single “ISUA (I Stay Up Anyway)” is an anthemic and punchy bit of punk rock with a furiously insistent bass line and a forceful stomp — and it’s the sort of single you can practically picture concertgoers in a small, dark and sweaty room yelling aloud to with upraised beers.

The recently released video features footage of the band playing a live gig but set in wild, psychedelic negatives — that almost makes it seem like going to a Plague Vendor show would be a trippy experience.