Category: post punk

New Video: The Fight Club Meets Art School Visuals for Ultrviolence’s “Radiation”

Ultrviolence’s latest single “Radiation” will further cement the Canadian trio’s burgeoning reputation for crating dark and moody post-punk/New Wave/darkwave-leaning rock while gently expanding upon the sound that initially captured my attention as the band pairs Nate J’s expressive and yearning baritone with ethereal synths, shimmering guitar chords played through copious reverb, and a driving rhythm consisting of four-on-the-floor drumming and propulsive bass chords.The recently released music video for the song is an aptly noir-ish video that features the awesomely casual destruction of an old cathode ray TV, some bad ass dudes swinging sledgehammers, brandishing knives, fighting each other and posing about; in some way, the video reminds me of a fashion forward jeans ad mixed with Fight Club.

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Comprised  of Dan Boeckner (vocals and guitar), who’s best known for being a member of Wolf Parade, Handsome Furs; Sam Brown (drums), best known for being a member of New Bomb Turks and Divine Fits; and Devojka (analog synths), the NYC-based trio Operators formed in 2013  — and in the past three years, the band has seen a rapidly growing national profile for an 80s New Wave and analog synth pop-inspired sound. And with the release of their critically applauded EP1 the NYC-based trio found themselves opening for the likes of Future Islands, New Pornographers and many other critically applauded contemporary acts; however, with the release of “Cold Light,” the first single off Operators’ forthcoming and highly-anticipated full-length effort Blue Wave reveals a band that has since expanded their sound with the addition of angular guitar and bass chords, pushing their sound more towards the direction of Joy Division and New Order.

Interestingly, Blue Wave‘s second and latest single, album title track “Blue Wave” has the band pairs layers of synths and swirling electronics and a propulsive, motorik groove with warm blasts of horns and Boeckner’s crooning vocals in a song that sounds as though it draws from Thin White Duke and Plastic Soul-era David Bowie and 80s post-punk and New Wave — in particular, I think of Flock of Seagulls, New Order, Depeche Mode and others. Arguably, “Blue Wave” may be the funkiest and most propulsive singles they’ve released to date.

Operators will be on tour to support the album and it’ll include a NYC area date at Baby’s All Right. Check out tour dates below.

 

Tour Dates

 3/28 – CHICAGO, IL – SCHUBAS
3/29 – MINNEAPOLIS, MN – 7TH ST. ENTRY
3/30 – OMAHA, NE – REVERB LOUNGE
4/01 – DENVER,CO – LOST LAKE LOUNGE
4/03 – SPOKANE, WA – THE BARTLETT
4/04 – SEATTLE, WA – SUNSET TAVERN
4/05 – VANCOUVER, BC – FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
4/06 – PORTLAND, OR – DOUG FIR LOUNGE
4/08 – SAN FRANCISCO, CA – SOCIAL HALL SF
4/09 – LOS ANGELES, CA – BOOTLEG THEATRE
4/10 – SAN DIEGO, CA – SODA BAR
4/11 – PHOENIX, AZ – VALLEY BAR
4/13 – AUSTIN, TX – THE SIDEWINDER
4/14 – DALLAS, TX – THREE LINKS
4/15 – HOUSTON, TX – THE RAVEN TOWER
4/16 – NEW ORLEANS, LA – GASA GASA
4/17 – ATLANTA, GA – THE EARL
4/19 – WASHINGTON, DC – DC9
4/21 – BROOKLYN, NY – BABY’S ALL RIGHT
4/22 – PHILADELPHIA, PA – BOOT & SADDLE
4/23 – CAMBRIDGE, MA – MIDDLE EAST UPSTAIRS
4/29 – HAVANA, CUBA – Fábrica de Arte Cubano (F.A.C.)
4/30 – HAVANA, CUBA – Fábrica de Arte Cubano (F.A.C.)

 

I’ve been under the weather the past few days and haven’t been able to do as much as I would have preferred; however, with the massive snowstorm we received here in the NYC area, there wasn’t much that could have been done anyway, and I honestly needed the rest. Now, earlier this monthI wrote about Atlanta, GA-based indie rock band Flower. And as the story went, the band’s frontman and primary Jack Fowler had written the material off the band’s soon-to-be released album Waste of Life, while his life had felt as though it were in a holding pattern. Although he had a busy year as the frontman of exwhy, who had signed to Other People Records and toured with renowned indie acts Pujol and Knox Hamilton, Fowler desperately wanted to focus on revealing his vulnerable side — and in turn, felt a need to write material that was informed and inspired by other aspects of his own life; in fact, Waste of Life is heavily informed by Fowler’s experience as a 9-5 officer done. As Fowler has explained in press notes “I was working a pretty decent office job and doing absolutely nothing beyond working and getting depressed. I was just spinning my wheels and growing bored and really depressed. I was struggling with talking to people, being social at all. That’s the core of this album—anxiety and not being sure how to define yourself. ” Certainly, if you’re creative or just didn’t quite know what you wanted to actually do with yourself, those feelings of depression, anxiety and utter worthlessness is familiar. Odds are that you’ve lived that every single moment of your waking life — and you’ve dreamt of quitting to write a book, record an album or to just regain your dignity.

Dreams,” which I wrote about three weeks ago possessed a pent up frustration over ambitions, hopes and a life that seem indefinitely stalled from some larger, unmoving (and unrelenting), outside force and not having an idea as to what would be the best thing to do next; so the song’s narrator winds up sitting inert and inactive on the sidelines out of fear of fucking everything up — and yet, hating himself for his inability to do anything at all. And despite the song’s desperation and hopelessness, there’s a subtle sense of hope; that things will get better and that somehow life will push you in the direction you need to be going even if you were unaware of it. Sonically, the song was reminiscent of  The Smiths and 80s post-punk as it paired bitter and confused sentiments with anthemic hooks, layers of shimmering guitar and driving rhythms.

Wasted Life’s latests single “Deadly Ill” may arguably be one of the more deceitfully straightforward post-punk songs on the album, as the anthemic hooks the band seems to specialize in are paired with thundering and propulsive drumming, angular guitar chords and an urgent desperation of someone who seems to be at the end of their rope with everyone and everything. But the irony at the core of the song is that the song’s narrator is trapped between a terrible certainty and an unknowable, unpredictable uncertainty. If you’ve been there the song feels as though it’s talking about your own personal experience in some way.

 

 

 

 

 

British indie rock sensation Escapists can trace their origins to when Simon Glancy (vocals) relocated to London to concentrate on his songwriting, and as soon as he moved he asked the only musician friend he knew to help him record his musical ideas, Oil Court (guitar). Court then quickly recruited his friend, composer Max Perryment to play bass. And as the story goes, the trio spent a week of intensive songwriting sessions before deciding that they had enough musical and creative simpatico to continue collaborating together. Court’s former schoolmate Any Walsh (drums) was recruited to finalize the band’s lineup, and the newly formed quartet began writing and recording material inspired by Arcade Fire, The National and Broken Social Scene.

The quartet’s debut single received airplay from XFM‘s John Kennedy and within that year, they were touring with Imagine Dragons and played sets at Reading and Leeds Festivals. Continuing to build upon the buzz they received nationally, the quartet spent 2013 writing and recording the material that would comprise their 2014 debut, Only Bodies, which was released to critical praise from the blogosphere.

Over the past year or so, the band has reportedly gone through a change in sonic direction with their sound inching towards dance-floor-leaning post-punk. “Pyramid Scheme,” the first single off the band’s Eat You Alive possesses enormous, anthemic hooks, shimmering and angular guitar chords, thundering drumming, sinuous bass lines, and swooningly plaintive vocals. Structurally speaking there are some playful changes in tempo in a song that sounds as though its indebted to the likes of U2, Editors, The Killers, New Order and others.

Certainly, with such an enormous hooks and a dance-friendly sound, I think we’ll be hearing quite a bit from them over the next few months.

 

 

Comprised of Mikkel B. Jakbosen (vocals and guitar), Morten Hansen (drums and vocals), and Steffan Petersen (guitar and bass). the Copenhagen, Denmark-based trio The Foreign Resort have received international attention for a sound that meshes elements of new wave and post-punk in a way that’s dark and moody and yet possesses an upbeat infectiousness. In fact, “Under Bright Neon Stars” the first single off the Danish trio’s soon-to-be released The American Dream EP is a swooningly Romantic and anthemic song consisting of shimmering guitars, a tight motorik groove similar to New Order‘s “Blue Monday” and “5 8 6,” paired with urgent and plaintive vocals that float over the propulsive mix. If you can’t image a club full of concertgoers shouting along to the song’s hook, there’s something wrong with you.

After listening to the song a number of times, the song seems to evoke the swelling hope and crippling fears of newfound love and in a way that should remind even the most jaded listener of their own foolhardy youth with a wistful smile.

The band is embarking on a fall tour. Check out the out dates below.

Tour Dates
10.22 • recordBar (Kansas City, MO)
10.23 • 3 Kings Tavern (Denver, CO)
10.24 • Lot 1 (Los Angeles, CA)
10.25 • Alex’s Bar (Long Beach, CA)
10.26 • The Merrow (San Diego, CA)
10.27 • Fulton 55 (Fresno, CA)
10.28 • Hemlock Tavern (San Francisco, CA)
10.30 • Kelly’s Olympian (Portland, OR)
10.31 • Substation (Seattle, WA)