New Audio: Introducing the Anthemic, Hook-Driven Sounds of Yacht Punk

Comprised of founding member and primary songwriter Graham Brockmiller (vocals, guitar), Michael Pozzi (guitar). Tricky (drums) and Justin Ricard (bass), the Los Angeles-based indie rock act Yacht Punk can trace their origins to when Brockmiller’s previous band Great White Buffalo had broken up. As the story goes, Brockmiller was laying on the floor of his unfinished basement studio in the Beachwood Canyon section, unsure of what would or should come next. But he did realize that it was time to go off on his own — and he spent the next year holed up in his studio by himself, contemplating life, writing, collecting nude calendars of Eastern European women suggestively holding large trophy carp and experimenting with the raw recording skills he had taught himself. Eventually, he began exploring new sounds and textures outside the traditional rock and indie rock arrangements of guitar, drums, bass as a way to test his DIY recording chops, as well as a way to find a more interesting, moodier sound.

Graham was tinkering with early Yacht Punk demos when he had a chance meeting with Michael Pozzi at Davey Wayne‘s. Pozzi quickly joined the project after the studio and hearing the direction the music was going. Graham’s roommate Tricky joined, followed by Justin Ricard, which completed the band’s lineup. The quartet took those demos to Matt Wignall‘s Tackyland studio, where they recorded “Hang Me Out to Dry” — and Wignall pushed the band’s sound into new, stranger places. They then took the Wignall-produced tracks back to L.A. where Will Brierre mixed and engineered them.

The band’s previous single “Need a Reason” was featured on Spotify’s New Noise and Fresh Finds playlists. And with a growing buzz surrounding the band, ┬átheir latest single “New Wave Denier” will further cement their reputation for crafting incredibly self-assured, slick, pop-inspired indie rock centered around rousingly anthemic hooks and earnest sentiment. Although this particular song is fueled by a sense of youthful disillusionment. As the band’s Brockmiller explains in press notes, their latest single “is about disillusionment and being over mainstream music. I wanted to capture the feeling of being young and disillusioned by life, by love, and by current and/or popular music. The sense of being unable to relate to your peers, the sense of searching for something more meaningful, and ultimately finding identity and belonging in the music from a past generation.”