Tag: Foo Fighters The Colour and the Shape

New Audio: Foo Fighters Release a Socially Conscious Anthem

Early last year, Foo Fighters — Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett, Pat Smear, and Rami Jaffee — finished work on what would eventually become their tenth full-length album, the Greg Kurstin and Foo Fighters co-produced Medicine at Midnight. At the time, Grohl and company intended for the album’s release to coincide with a massive world tour that the applauded act was about to embark on to celebrate the band’s 25th anniversary. But like countless other acts around the globe, the COVID-19 pandemic threw a monkey wrench into their plans.

Because of the uncertainty of the situation, the members of the band waited for a while, trying to figure out what their next steps were, but eventually they all came to the realization that music is meant to be heard, no matter“whether it’s in a festival field with 50,000 of our coolest friends or alone in your living room or on a Saturday night with a stiff cocktail,” the band’s Dave Grohl wrote in an letter accompanying press notes.

Now, as you may recall, Foo Fighters’ tenth album Medicine at Midnight is slated for a February 5, 2021 release through Roswell Records/RCA Records — and they managed to start off the New Year with the enormous arena rock friendly ripper “No Son of Mine,” a track that nods at Ace of Spades-era Mötorhead, Kill ’em All-era Metallica and Queen‘s “Stone Cold Crazy, complete with anthemic, raise-your-beer-in-the-air and shout along worthy hooks.

Medicine at Midnight’s third and latest single “Waiting On A War” continues a remarkable run of arena rock anthems — but in this case, the new single manages to pull from several different Foo Fighters eras — The Colour and the Shape, There Is Nothing Left to Lose and One By One in particular come to mind as a result of its song structure: Beginning with acoustic guitar and string arrangement driven verses and an enormous, rousingly anthemic hook, the song slowly builds up in intensity until the 3:15 mark or so, when the song turns into a cathartic explosion of power chords and thunderous drumming. Lyrically, the song manages to recall ’80s anthems like Nena’s “99 Luftballons,” Sting’s “Russians” and others, and it seems to suggest, much like the old saying, “the more things change, the more things remain the same.” Decades have changed, and we still seem to be on brink of our own annihilation . . .

Interestingly, as Dave Grohl explains in press notes, the song is inspired by personal events — and may be among the more personal songs in the band’s extensive catalog:

“Last fall, as I was driving my daughter to school, she turned to me and asked, ‘Daddy, is there going to be a war?’ My heart sank as I realized that she was now living under the same dark cloud that I had felt 40 years ago,” Grohl recalls.

I wrote ‘Waiting on a War’ that day.

Everyday waiting for the sky to fall. Is there more to this than that? Is there more to this than just waiting on a war? Because I need more. We all do.

This song was written for my daughter, Harper, who deserves a future, just as every child does. “

New Audio: Montreal’s Dave Chose Releases a Hook Driven Power Pop/Grunge Rock-Inspired Single

Dave Chose is a L’Ascension-De-Notre-Seigneur, Quebec-born, Montreal-based singer/songwriter, whose work is thematically  focuses on poetry of the mundane with material that celebrates the taste of convenience store iced tea, and the pleasure of knowing how to roll your own cigarettes among other things.  Playing with a judiciously loud backing band, Chose’s work sonically is a sort of sensitive pop punk. Building upon a growing profile in his native Quebec, Chose wrote the theme song for Puisqu’on se tue toujours trop tard, a short film directed by Jean-Martin Gagnon

Last week, Chose released a double single, which featured two very personal and distinctive tracks — “Poffes” and “De l’inconvénient d’être nê,” which were recorded his backing band and longtime collaborators Nicolas Beaudin, Jonathan Bigras and Benoit Bouchard. “Poffes,” the latest release off the double single was originally written while he was working on his first album — but after some time and perspective, he revised the song, pushing the song and its sound to where he felt it needed to go. Centered around fuzzy power chords, forceful drumming, an unerring knack for infectiously melodic and enamors hooks, Chose’s latest single reminds me quite a bit of early Foo Fighters — in particular, their self-titled debut and The Colour and the Shape. But interestingly enough, the song features paradoxical lyrics that deal with self-destruction and the urgency of living. Simply put, the song fucking rips. Nuff said, folks. 

Over the past couple of months, I’ve written a bit about the Brooklyn-based indie rock act Big Cheese. And since their formation back in 2012, the band has released two albums — 2014’s Loose Teeth and 2016’s Supersonic Nothing, which have helped them establish a reputation for crafting 90s alt rock-inspired fuzz pop ant=hems paired with sarcasm and irony soaked lyrics.

Now, as you may recall, the band’s forthcoming Oliver Ignatius-produced third full-length album, Wild to Be Born is slated for a September 13, 2019 release. Deriving its title from the untamed sentiment of the album’s material — and an overall feeling of being ravenous for some kind of awakened, the album, which was recorded at Holy Fang Studios reportedly finds the band expanding their sound with the material drawing from Amerciana, grunge and several other genres and styles. I’ve written about two album singles so far:  the anthemic “Golden.” a mosh-pit friendly bit of fuzz pop that brought Dinosaur, Jr., JOVM mainstays Dead Stars and The Colour and the Shape-era Foo Fighters to mind — and the grunge rock-inspired “Filthy Rich.” The album’s latest single “In This World” is centered by a propulsive and rolling bass line, thunderous drumming, slashing guitar lines and ironically delivered lyrics, making it the most post punk-like and forward thinking song off the album to date

 

 

 

Earlier this month, I wrote about the Brooklyn-based indie rock act Big Cheese. And as you may recall, since their formation back in 2012, the members of the band have released two albums — 2014’s Loose Teeth and 2016’s Supersonic Nothing  —that have helped the band develop a reputation for crafting 90s alt rock-inspired fuzz pop anthems paired with sarcasm-soaked lyrics.

Slated for a September 13, 2019 release, the band’s forthcoming Oliver Ignatius-produced third full-length album, Wild to Be Born derives its title from the untamed sentiment of the album’s material — and an overall feeling of being ravenous for some kind of awakening. Their third album, which was recorded at Holy Fang Studios reportedly finds the band expanding their sound with the material drawing from Amerciana, grunge and several other genres and styles. Album track “Golden” was an anthemic, mosh-pit friendly bit of fuzz pop that may remind some listeners of s of Dinosaur, Jr., JOVM mainstays Dead Stars, The Colour and the Shape-era Foo Fighters and others — but with the urgent and anxious air of our current sociopolitical moment. Interestingly, Wild to Be Born‘s latest single “Filthy Rich” features ironically delivered lyrics while further establishing the band’s 90s alt rock-inspired sound — but unlike its immediate predecessor, the anthemic track is centered by the cool and effortless swagger of old pros.

 

 

Since their formation back in 2012, Brooklyn-based indie rock act Big Cheese has released two albums — 2014’s Loose Teeth and 2016’s Supersonic Nothing  —that have helped the band develop a reputation for crafting 90s alt rock-inspired fuzz pop anthems paired with sarcasm-soaked lyrics.

The band’s forthcoming Oliver Ignatius-produced third full-length album, Wild to Be Born is slated for a September 13, 2019 release. Recorded at Brooklyn-based Holy Fang Studios, Big Cheese’s third album reportedly find step band expanding their sound with the material drawing from Americana, grunge and others. Interestingly, the album’s title is derived from the untamed sentiment of the album’s material — and a general feeling of being ravenous for some kind of awakening.

“Golden,” Wild to Be Born‘s latest single is an anthemic, mosh-pit friendly bit of fuzz pop centered around layers upon layers of power chords, thunderous drumming and ironically delivered lyrics — and while the song will remind some listeners of Dinosaur, Jr., JOVM mainstays Dead Stars, The Colour and the Shape-era Foo Fighters and others, the hook driven track possesses the urgent and anxious air of our sociopolitical moment; the one we feel and observe within out every interaction, thought, movement and dreams.

The band has two upcoming NYC area shows — July 25, 2019 at The Footlight and August 15, 2019 at 11th Street Bar.